CA VX to Fed VX conversion questions - Fuelly Forums

Android Users - Coming Soon! - Migrating from aCar 4.8 to 5.0

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-02-2008, 11:31 PM   #1
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 22
Country: United States
CA VX to Fed VX conversion questions

Hey all.

I'm planning on converting my '94 CA VX to Fed. I've been reading and re-reading threads like this. There are some real gems on this forum and I appreciate anyone that's taken the time to share.

I've got the wideband o2 sensor, appropriate ecu, and will hopefully be squaring away some connectors tomorrow off of ebay.

I do however still have a few questions:

1.) What's the best way to test continuity without cutting up the plastic sheath of the wire (too much)?

2.) It sounds like shielding against RFI should be done. What is the best way to do this? Which wires need to be shielded?

3.) I had a number three, but now I can't, for the life of me, remember what it was. I'm sure I'll think of it soon....

Thanks!
__________________

GasSavers_mango is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2008, 08:09 AM   #2
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 408
Country: United States
Quote:
Originally Posted by mango View Post
What's the best way to test continuity without cutting up the plastic sheath of the wire (too much)?
There are several approaches to this. Here's one idea: unplug the connector and touch a probe to the metal inside the connector. Or use what's called a backprobe (basically a long pin) inserted from the wiring side of the connector.

See related ideas here: http://www.gassavers.org/showpost.ph...12&postcount=2

Quote:
It sounds like shielding against RFI should be done. What is the best way to do this? Which wires need to be shielded?
A nice neat approach is to use multiconductor shielded cable, which can be found at a place that sells electrical supplies.

Example:
http://www.electronicsurplus.com/com...oduct_id=79229
http://www.surplussales.com/Wire-Cable/Wire2.html

In the other thread you referenced, I think I describe which wires need to be shielded.

Post more questions here and I'll try to answer. I found that the job was fairly simple, and worthwhile. The hard part was gathering all the information together, but once I had that, getting it done didn't take too long.

What I suggest is that you don't start until after you understand the whole picture of what you'll be doing.
__________________

monroe74 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2008, 11:17 PM   #3
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 22
Country: United States
Quote:
Originally Posted by monroe74 View Post
There are several approaches to this. Here's one idea: unplug the connector and touch a probe to the metal inside the connector. Or use what's called a backprobe (basically a long pin) inserted from the wiring side of the connector.

See related ideas here: http://www.gassavers.org/showpost.ph...12&postcount=2



A nice neat approach is to use multiconductor shielded cable, which can be found at a place that sells electrical supplies.

Example:
http://www.electronicsurplus.com/com...oduct_id=79229
http://www.surplussales.com/Wire-Cable/Wire2.html

In the other thread you referenced, I think I describe which wires need to be shielded.

Post more questions here and I'll try to answer. I found that the job was fairly simple, and worthwhile. The hard part was gathering all the information together, but once I had that, getting it done didn't take too long.

What I suggest is that you don't start until after you understand the whole picture of what you'll be doing.


Monroe, thanks so much! You are very knowledgeable!
GasSavers_mango is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2008, 11:27 PM   #4
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 22
Country: United States
Alright, I remembered what my third question was going to be:

3.) My VX currently has NGK zfr5f-11 spark plugs in it. They are pretty new. There are threads here, here, and here that make is sound like I should replace them with zfr4f-11 's. Is this really necessary?

The under the hood sticker recommends zfr4f-11's in general and zfr5f-11's for hot weather. I do live in San Diego where it is rather warm. Does this sticker apply only to a CA emissions vx?

thank you!
GasSavers_mango is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2008, 01:50 PM   #5
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 408
Country: United States
Quote:
Originally Posted by mango View Post
You are very knowledgeable
Thanks for your kind words. I'm just trying to give back what I've learned here and in other forums. Because that's where a lot of my knowledge came from!

Quote:
Originally Posted by mango View Post
The under the hood sticker recommends zfr4f-11's in general and zfr5f-11's for hot weather.
That's the same guidance that appears in the service manual. It applies to all years of the VX. Both CA and Federal.

I think you should be fine sticking with what you have, since you're in a hot climate. But make sure the plug is really ZFR5F-11, and not ZFR5FIX-11. The latter is the more expensive Iridium version. In one of the other threads you cited, someone said they had ZFR5F-11, but the photo they posted looked like ZFR5FIX-11.

In one of those threads, someone indicated that the Iridium plug is not good for the VX, and I have no reason to doubt that. But you should be OK if it's really ZFR5F-11.

An official NGK picture of the ZFR5F-11 is here: http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/apps/ca...r=ZFR5F-11%20#

The difference between the 4F and the 5F has to do with what's called a heat rating. A nice explanation of what this means is here: http://www.ngk.de/Spark_plugs.649.0.html

Also see here: http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/techinf...overviewp2.asp

The 5F is a "colder" plug, compared with the 4F. If the 5F is wrong for your conditions, you can tell by looking at it. There will be a tendency for it to attract carbon deposits. In other words, a visual inspection of the plug can help you tell if you're using the right heat rating, for your driving conditions.

By the way, you might want to look around and get your hands on the Helms factory service manual. It exists in a pdf version. The book you want covers the Civic, 1992-1995.
monroe74 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2008, 02:06 PM   #6
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 408
Country: United States
Something else to think about.

There are people on this forum who have taken a CA VX and converted it to Federal, and are driving it outside of CA. That's the category I'm in.

There are people on this forum who have bought a Federal VX, and have registered it in CA, and have passed smog.

But I don't know for sure that there's anyone who has done what you're trying to do: convert a CA VX to Federal, and pass smog in CA.

You should realize that just because a Federal VX can pass smog in CA, that doesn't mean that you're going to be able to do the same thing. Why? Because I think the CA smog-enforcement system applies the standard that is relevant to each vehicle. In other words, when you buy a used Federal VX in another state, and import it to CA, CA law allows that. And CA will read the VIN and apply only the Federal standard, not the CA standard. But in your situation, when you go for your smog test, CA will read your VIN and know your car was built as a CA car, and will expect it to pass CA smog. Will it pass? I don't know. Maybe not. Especially if the engine is not in perfect shape.

The good news is this: I think all you would have to do to get around this problem is temporarily reinstall your CA ECU. Something that's easy to do.

I don't know if you would also have to temporarily reinstall your CA O2 sensor. Probably not (in '92, the CA VX had the 5-wire sensor, even though the ECU didn't support lean burn). But if you follow the instructions I posted in the other thread, swapping sensors is easy. It's just done via unplugging connectors. There's no need to deal with cutting wires, soldering or tape (once you've created the special harness I described).
monroe74 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2008, 05:42 PM   #7
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 22
Country: United States
Again, I very much appreciate it! Thank you!

Quote:
Originally Posted by monroe74 View Post
Thanks for your kind words. I'm just trying to give back what I've learned here and in other forums. Because that's where a lot of my knowledge came from!



That's the same guidance that appears in the service manual. It applies to all years of the VX. Both CA and Federal.

I think you should be fine sticking with what you have, since you're in a hot climate. But make sure the plug is really ZFR5F-11, and not ZFR5FIX-11. The latter is the more expensive Iridium version. In one of the other threads you cited, someone said they had ZFR5F-11, but the photo they posted looked like ZFR5FIX-11.

In one of those threads, someone indicated that the Iridium plug is not good for the VX, and I have no reason to doubt that. But you should be OK if it's really ZFR5F-11.

An official NGK picture of the ZFR5F-11 is here: http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/apps/ca...r=ZFR5F-11%20#

The difference between the 4F and the 5F has to do with what's called a heat rating. A nice explanation of what this means is here: http://www.ngk.de/Spark_plugs.649.0.html

Also see here: http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/techinf...overviewp2.asp

The 5F is a "colder" plug, compared with the 4F. If the 5F is wrong for your conditions, you can tell by looking at it. There will be a tendency for it to attract carbon deposits. In other words, a visual inspection of the plug can help you tell if you're using the right heat rating, for your driving conditions.

By the way, you might want to look around and get your hands on the Helms factory service manual. It exists in a pdf version. The book you want covers the Civic, 1992-1995.
GasSavers_mango is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2008, 05:44 PM   #8
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 22
Country: United States
You do bring up a very good point that I have been wondering about myself. I'm kind of curious to see how it goes. I'll give it shot getting it smogged in Fed mode. As you said, I can always fall back to CA mode. I'll report back with the results when the time comes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by monroe74 View Post
Something else to think about.

There are people on this forum who have taken a CA VX and converted it to Federal, and are driving it outside of CA. That's the category I'm in.

There are people on this forum who have bought a Federal VX, and have registered it in CA, and have passed smog.

But I don't know for sure that there's anyone who has done what you're trying to do: convert a CA VX to Federal, and pass smog in CA.

You should realize that just because a Federal VX can pass smog in CA, that doesn't mean that you're going to be able to do the same thing. Why? Because I think the CA smog-enforcement system applies the standard that is relevant to each vehicle. In other words, when you buy a used Federal VX in another state, and import it to CA, CA law allows that. And CA will read the VIN and apply only the Federal standard, not the CA standard. But in your situation, when you go for your smog test, CA will read your VIN and know your car was built as a CA car, and will expect it to pass CA smog. Will it pass? I don't know. Maybe not. Especially if the engine is not in perfect shape.

The good news is this: I think all you would have to do to get around this problem is temporarily reinstall your CA ECU. Something that's easy to do.

I don't know if you would also have to temporarily reinstall your CA O2 sensor. Probably not (in '92, the CA VX had the 5-wire sensor, even though the ECU didn't support lean burn). But if you follow the instructions I posted in the other thread, swapping sensors is easy. It's just done via unplugging connectors. There's no need to deal with cutting wires, soldering or tape (once you've created the special harness I described).
GasSavers_mango is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2008, 04:26 AM   #9
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 408
Country: United States
"I'll give it shot getting it smogged in Fed mode."

I think I recently read a thread here about someone having success with that. Sorry I don't remember exactly which thread. Anyway, give it a try.
monroe74 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2008, 11:03 AM   #10
Registered Member
 
Reborn996's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 45
Country: United States
Send a message via Yahoo to Reborn996
I just did this on Saturday... passed with flying colors too! Mine is a 1992 CA version VX that I just recently converted to a Federal by adding the P07-A01 ECU and 5-wire O2 sensor. I had also done a basic tune-up with plugs, cap, and rotor but otherwise it was stock.

So, with the motor running good you should be able to pass CA smog with a Federal version VX.

David
__________________

__________________
2005 Honda Civic Hybrid - commuter
1999 Porsche 911 C2 - weekend toy
2005 Toyota Tacoma - hauler/work truck
Reborn996 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
old user, new car kamesama980 Introduce Yourself - New member Welcome 0 02-28-2008 06:58 PM
window defrosting methods? lunarhighway General Maintenance and Repair 32 12-06-2007 07:03 AM
Is there a OBDI or OBDII conversion for older vehicles? kozaz General Fuel Topics 3 11-13-2007 08:32 PM
Better gas mileage for an RV 73challenger General Fuel Topics 5 10-31-2007 05:08 AM
Drove first hybrid-real eye opener tulsa_97sr5 General Fuel Topics 8 07-09-2007 12:51 PM

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 12:31 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.