Using Larger Oil Filter? - Page 2 - Fuelly Forums

Android Users - Coming Soon! - Migrating from aCar 4.8 to 5.0

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-08-2008, 07:14 AM   #11
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 146
Country: United States
Send a message via AIM to GasSavers_Dust
Some reading for you

You own a mustang, and you have a 3/4 x16 thread. Depending on who you are, you either research this stuff like I do, or you buy whatever the Jiffy Lube place sells you.

Well, a guy with money and time at BITOG by the name of Big O Dave came up with this list of 3/4x16 filters, with sizes, pictures, and filter areas.

Measurements were made with a ruler and a tire depth guage

Oil Filter Chart

Here are the pictures of the filters he cut open

FL-1A Equivalents
Amsoil EaO15 "Nanofilter"
Baldwin B2
Baldwin B2-HPG
Bosch 3500
Denso 150-1004
Donaldson P169071
Donaldson P550008
Fleetguard LF3313
Fleetguard LF3487
Fram HP1
Fram PH8A
Fram TG8A
Fram XG8A
K&N HP-3001
Mobil 1 M1-301
Mobil 1 M1-301EP
Motorcraft FL-1A
Napa 1515/Wix 51515 (Same thing)
Professional's Choice Q1A
Purolator PremiumPlus L30001
Purolator PureONE PL30001
STP S8A
Supertech ST8A

FL-299 Equivalents
Baldwin BT237
Baldwin BT251
Donaldson P550299
Donaldson P554407
Fleetguard LF697
Fram PH977A
Motorcraft FL-299
Purolator PremiumPlus L40017
Wix 51773

"GIGANTO" Filter
Napa 1714/Wix 51714 (Same thing)


The overall size of the filters can be based off this information
FL-299's are all about this size.

FL-1A's are all about this size.

And the "Giganto" Wix 51714 is this size.

Remember that it isn’t just the size that matters, but also the quality.

Some companies have started including beta ratios with their filters.
www.wixfilters.com has most extensive list that I have found, but other websites are adding them.
Also check
http://www.baldwinfilters.com/
http://www.pureoil.com/

Explanation about Beta Ratios
http://www.hastingsfilter.com/engineer/98_4.html

For example, the FL1A -> wix #51515 is 2/20=19/41.

So the 51515 is 50% efficient at 19 microns and larger.

Beta 20 is 95% efficient.

So the 51515 is 95% efficient at 41 microns and larger.

Lastly remember that a new filter is worse at filtering than a used one. As the bigger particles build up in the filter, the holes get smaller, and smaller particles can be trapped. Think of it exponentially. As the filter clogs, it can trap particles better until it clogs.

The filter links aren't working. I will email the links in a Word document if you are interested.
__________________

GasSavers_Dust is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2008, 10:07 AM   #12
Supporting Member
 
cfg83's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,779
Country: United States
Dust -

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dust View Post
...

Lastly remember that a new filter is worse at filtering than a used one. As the bigger particles build up in the filter, the holes get smaller, and smaller particles can be trapped. Think of it exponentially. As the filter clogs, it can trap particles better until it clogs.

The filter links aren't working. I will email the links in a Word document if you are interested.
Yes please. I just sent you a PM. Coincidently, I just got the Blackstone oil testing kit in the mail yesterday. I will do a two-step process. I think I will analyze my next oil change base on the "normal" filter currently in my car. My mechanic uses Chevron Supreme oil and Purolator filters. This will give me a baseline. If I have finished my research, I will try the new-bigger TBD filter then. If I haven't, then it will be the following oil change.

CarloSW2
__________________

__________________
Old School SW2 EPA ... New School Civic EPA :

What's your EPA MPG? http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/calculatorSelectYear.jsp
cfg83 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2008, 07:55 PM   #13
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 146
Country: United States
Send a message via AIM to GasSavers_Dust
it should be in your box. take a look at the pictures, and determine which is best for you, and your budget/requirements.
GasSavers_Dust is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2008, 11:55 AM   #14
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 14
Country: United States
Smile Filter Info Fyi ... "new Patent"

i ran across this website .. they do not havethe filter in full production yet . It holds real promise as a solution for the "filter problem" ...
AND FYI ....you can put a bunch of magnets on your filter NOW and catch stuff .... i did a 500 miles test of the magnet catch ability and was really surprised!! will post photos if anyone is interested?
dddon ... (i think in 3D too!)

http://www.practicingoilanalysis.com...pin-on+Filters
dddon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2008, 08:25 PM   #15
Registered Member
 
JanGeo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,442
Country: United States
Send a message via Yahoo to JanGeo
Interesting to hear about that hybrid filter - I am using a special filter purchased from Synlube that filters down to 5 microns with a special solid synthetic fiber filter material that has high flow properties.
JanGeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2008, 12:36 AM   #16
Registered Member
 
suspendedhatch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 445
Country: United States
Send a message via AIM to suspendedhatch
There is no such thing as restriction in the oil filter hurting your power or mileage. All oil filters have a bypass. A large amount of your oil at all times is bypassed hopefully to be filtered the next time around. More and more oil is bypassed as the filter medium becomes clogged.

I very much agree with the thought that maybe this guy's dipstick was leading him to overfill his oil to the point that the crank was splashing in it.

Now here is my wild unproven theory. There IS a problem with all mechanical oil pumps in that they raise oil pressure too high when RPMs climb. It IS beneficial to limit the pressure at a certain point. His motor, being a domestic motor, may have benefited by running less oil if somehow it reduced maximum oil pressure. However, you cannot apply this to any Japanese motor or modern motor. Further, I'd be too afraid of the consequences of messing with the oil system, although having the mark in the middle is hardly risky. If you want optimal control of oil pressure, you switch to an electric pump. This is no small task. Switch to an electric water pump instead and call it a day. Or you can put a weak vacuum pump to suck on your crankcase.

Domestic motors are often based on recycled designs from way back in the sixties. That is why many tricks exist to increase efficiency of these motors, but they don't work on Japanese motors. The Japanese tend to start completely from scratch every 15 years or less. There is also a whole different mentality to how they engineer things. Domestic companies prefer to increase power by increasing engine size, while foreign companies (who are often under strain of fitting into tax brackets based on engine size) tend to squeeze out every last drop of efficiency from a small motor. I've been told that domestics start with the nuts and bolts and Japanese start with the air passages. I'm sorry to single out the Japanese; there are in fact examples of highly advanced, highly efficient motors from all companies from GM to Toyota to Citreon to BMW.
__________________

Civic VX, D15Z7, 5 Speed LSD, AEM EMS, AEM UEGO, AEM Twin Fire, Distributor-less, Waste Spark
suspendedhatch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2008, 07:15 AM   #17
Registered Member
 
JanGeo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,442
Country: United States
Send a message via Yahoo to JanGeo
The bypass is a pressure controlled valve which usually opens at 80psi of pressure between the high (pump) and low (engine) pressure sides at all other times ALL the oil flows through the filter material. Take a filter apart some time and see how it works. And yes pumping through a filter takes power from the engine so a blocked filter takes more power than a clean one.
JanGeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2008, 08:54 AM   #18
Registered Member
 
GasSavers_RoadWarrior's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,652
I knew a guy who boasted about "Getting full oil pressure at idle" after putting 20W50 or something worse in his ford that was specced for 5W20. I tried 'splaining that this just meant he was bypassing the filter and barely getting any filtration, but ... he was kinda deaf to common sense.
__________________
I remember The RoadWarrior..To understand who he was, you have to go back to another time..the world was powered by the black fuel & the desert sprouted great cities..Gone now, swept away..two mighty warrior tribes went to war & touched off a blaze which engulfed them all. Without fuel, they were nothing..thundering machines sputtered & stopped..Only those mobile enough to scavenge, brutal enough to pillage would survive. The gangs took over the highways, ready to wage war for a tank of juice
GasSavers_RoadWarrior is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2008, 01:07 PM   #19
Registered Member
 
JanGeo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,442
Country: United States
Send a message via Yahoo to JanGeo
Actually NO he was getting full oil pressure into the engine and probably on both sides of the oil filter element. The problem is he has too much oil pressure in the entire system and adding strain on the cam drive be it chain or gears since most engines drive the pump from the cam shaft to keep a load on it to prevent backlash when the lifters ride down the back sides of the cam lobes. Normally the oil pressure would be a bit lower at idle when you don't really need too much pressure anyway. The bypass only works when the filter element is not allowing the oil to flow through it fast enough like when the engine oil is cold or too thick or the the filter element is blocked with dirt/sludge. The reason you don't rev the engine too much when the oil is cold is because the bypass can open up and possibly allow junk that had been trapped in the filter paper/whatever to flow past the filter into the engine oil galleries. Plus it pust more strain on the oil pump.
JanGeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2008, 11:45 PM   #20
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 174
Country: United States
I am using a lifetime oil filter. It is made of 6061 T6 Billet aluminum housing, Viton O rings, duel woven T304 Stainless Steel mesh, 2 rare earth magnets. It has a by pass of up to 1000 psi. Increase flow to 20 + gpm one pass absolute filtering.
I have this installed on my 1992 3000GT twin turbo VR4. I use Shell Rotella T 15/40w oil. (4 quarts Walmart $9.27). This oil is Diesel rated with heavy detergents. I quit using Mobil 1. Change oil at 6000 miles. I clean the filter at about 1000 miles. I can remove the canister with out any oil drip. This car puts out a lot of heat and this has helped keep the car cooler. I have not yet got one for my Mazda. It was not cheap.
__________________

1cheap1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help! AlfieGT Fuelly Web Support and Community News 1 05-23-2011 12:35 AM
Mercedes Stop-start technology lunarhighway Automotive News, Articles and Products 0 07-30-2007 04:46 AM
How far do you drive daily? OdieTurbo General Fuel Topics 56 03-31-2007 02:49 AM
A RAV4 to go with the Prius? krousdb General Discussion (Off-Topic) 31 12-30-2006 05:32 AM
TPS Will a 88 Civic DPFI TPS Work on a 92-95 D15z1 8Civic8 General Maintenance and Repair 2 11-09-2006 11:12 PM

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 03:56 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.