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Old 11-18-2015, 03:35 AM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andyrobo View Post
I agree, I like small diesels. For what ever reason they are not as common in the USA as they are in Europe. Hopefully we will get more diesel option in the decade ahead as CAFE laws push OEMs to reach a 54.5 MPR for their fleets by 2025. This means we will see smaller, lighter weight vehicles with more efficient engines.
Hello you can find several options for diesel vehicles in different ares.
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Old 11-18-2015, 03:37 AM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andyrobo View Post
I agree, I like small diesels. For what ever reason they are not as common in the USA as they are in Europe. Hopefully we will get more diesel option in the decade ahead as CAFE laws push OEMs to reach a 54.5 MPR for their fleets by 2025. This means we will see smaller, lighter weight vehicles with more efficient engines.
Hello you can find small engine vehicles in many areas. Diesel engine vehicles are easy to find in the market place and also internet websites.
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Old 11-20-2015, 09:34 PM   #53
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Hello, There are many options and styles of used Dodge trucks although some are harder to find than others.

There is the popular Ram series that has been around for many years. The Ram is Dodges full sized trucks. There is the Ram 1500 1/2 ton, 2500 3/4 truck and the 3500 1 ton truck.You can learn more about the diesel engine vehicles at Kjp Dieselmotordeler Eksklusivt via dieselgrossisten.no.


One model that is not so easy to find is the Dodge Ramcharger. This was a vehicle that was built to compete against the Chevrolet full size K5 Blazer and the full size Ford Bronco.
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Old 12-07-2015, 11:26 PM   #54
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Now Isuzu have the 1.9Ltr Engine, for the truck and Body-on-Frame SUV. It will not be available in Thailand until well into 2016 though.

We have just bought the New Ford Everest Titanium Plus 3.2L 5 Cyl 4WD. Sounds great and is quick.
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Old 01-09-2016, 04:32 AM   #55
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The big break through that could make small diesels more prevalent and popular in the N America is a future technological advancement or series of advancements that could result in much cheaper, much less complicated, and more packable exhaust-treatment systems for diesel power trains, which right now is such a cost and engineering constraint. The current situation puts diesels and hybrids nearly on-par with each other from a cost standpoint. Such a break through in diesel technologies is far more likely than with hybrid technologies, as parallel hybrids will always require two power storage systems, two fuels, two power delivery systems, and two drive systems that must work in parallel. Add to that, battery technologies have to come along technologically to provide much more range without adding weight, and simultaneously become much, much cheaper. From a pure engineering standpoint, I personally believe it is much more likely that the exhaust-treatment hurdle could be more easily met than making the parallel hybrid much more cost feasible; at least in the short term. And, at least in the pickup truck American market, this more marketable diesel would be very welcome with the American pickup truck consumer. Unlike before 2010, American/Canadian consumers have now learned how good modern diesels are with respect to refinement, and pickup truck consumers have now learned the value of low-end torque with only adequate horsepower.

Even though diesels have become more palatable to our driving tastes overall lately, there is still a few detractors to outright mainstream acceptance, even if the cost and engineering hurdles are met:

Detractor #1. There will still be a certain percentage of pickup truck prospective buyers over here that give much credence to 1/4-mile and 0-60 times, rather than real-world, usable capability being the main consideration. And it is in this area, on the drag strip, where a gas engine, be it naturally-aspired or otherwise, will likely always have the advantage over diesels, because they rev so quickly and power and torque move up the dyno in a linear fashion. It is only when extreme performance diesels are planted in these same vehicles, like we have in the heavy-duty category, where they can compete on the drag strip. But the problem here is that the mpg advantage is diminished in favor of overkill power and torque. And that leads to detractor #2.

Detractor #2. There is a certain percentage of American pickup truck enthusiasts who have become accustomed to the amazingly powerful diesels found in the heavy-duty trucks and those persons think of these performance kings when they think of diesels; not the fuel-saving qualities, and some of these folks don't even know an equally-performing diesel can get better mpg. These persons won't accept smaller, more frugal diesel options and hate them, which has been opinionated in this very thread with respect to the Ram Ecodiesel and the little Duramax. Many truckers want and expect something like the Cummins 5.0 V8 in the 1/2-dury Ram, which admittedly would be the performance king even beyond the Hemi V8; but such an engine would not increase mpg significantly in any driving situation, and such an engine would be even more costly planted in a pickup truck than a more reasonably-capable diesel.

Detractor #3. There is a large group of Americans who have a view that our transportation system needs to eventually be electrified; and mentioning anything that allows an ICE-powered vehicle to compete with another technology that moves us closer to that electrification goal is met with strong arguments, much of which are manufactured science, claiming diesels are still dirty and less refined than they are in reality. They also promote ideas that diesel fuel is hard to find; it's refinement and burning create more greenhouse gases than they do in reality; that the fuel is always a dollar per gallon more throughout every area of the country; and then they'll minimize the positives, such as how flex-fuel compression-ignition can be made, the higher energy density of the fuel; the lower hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide tendencies of engine-out performance, the lower energy requirement to produce the fuel, etc. These fallacies are not always intentional; many of these electrification enthusiasts simply have not followed the industry or technologies and don't realize how far diesel technologies have come, since they live in America where the products have not been in our mainstream and therefore they think of old semi trucks and other big machines when they think of diesels.

Detractor #4. This one is legitimate. Even to the diesel fanatic, like myself, the last nine years of clean diesel products have left a bad taste in our mouths with respect to complexity, reliability, and durability, and cost-versus benefit. The systems employed to make them clean have been problematic, expensive to repair and maintain, and expensive to buy. Right before the new regulations came in to effect (2004-2006) some really good products hit our market, albeit for a short time. The 3.2 I6 and 3.0 V6 from Mercedes Benz; the 1.9-liter TDI with unit injection fro VW; the 2.8-liter Jeep Liberty via VMI, all provided Americans a glimpse of modern, refined diesels wit superior mpg and torque, and they could be purchased for a mere $1K-$2K more than the base gas engine, but this was before the fuel-neutral regulations came starting in 2007, and that's when things went bad. In order to get beyond this new, bad reputation, diesels are going to have to get: cheaper, cheaper to maintain, and built with better reliability and durability. The technology has gone through a period of bad times, not unlike gas-power experience with the advent of unleaded gas and catalytic converters back in the late 70s.

So I had to have a truck; wanted and needed only a regular cab, and even though there were two diesel choices in the class of truck I was looking for, there was not really a good diesel choice. So I ended up with a Ford F150 with a 2.7 EB rather than a preferred diesel, because with the F150, I could get the low-end torque I prefer via turbo-charged DI spark-ignition at my price point under $28K; compared to the cheapest diesel in a compact truck starting at $34K, and the cheapest in a full-size truck starting @ $38K. Right now, for me, diesel is not even in the game. Cost reduction is the key for bringing diesels to all configurations and trim levels at a reasonable price, and that just isn't where we are at.
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Old 01-09-2016, 08:21 AM   #56
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That was a fair and very factual review, thanks for writing it. As you say, one of the main reasons people are still so anti diesel in the US it seems is because the diesel products on sale there are not as good as they can be, the "best of the best" simply aren't for sale. For example you might only be able to purchase one or two diesel variants of the VW Golf, the more powerful and/or more efficient smaller versions aren't as readily available as they are here, and as diesels only make up less than 5% of the market over there, people's opinions of them are very outdated as has been evident from many discussions from various members on this forum. And as far as I can tell, the ULTRA effecient 60-70 MPG diesels you find in smaller cars here are non existent there, so the real economy benefits don't exist either.

The scr (selected catalytic reduction) systems fitted to modern diesels here are not that expensive either, and cut N0X by 90% not to mention C02 which is already low for diesels by about 4%.
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Old 01-11-2016, 06:26 AM   #57
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Because of the limited availability of diesels, I am sure the manufacturers also take advantage of those that really want one by only offering it on higher trim models. The Jetta is what comes to mind. Not the best example because of VW's cheating, but the price wasn't that great compared to a comparably equipped gas model, but you had to get at least the mid grade trim to get the diesel. it simply wasn't available in a base trim car.
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Old 01-11-2016, 11:39 AM   #58
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That's a shame as it gives the false impression that diesels are expensive and overpriced. Not the case here, there are some very cheap basic diesels out there if you want one. Admittedly they are nearly always still slightly more expensive, by about 1000-1500, unless you buy a premium luxury car, BMW, Mercedes, Audi then the performance diesels can be cheaper than the petrols (despite identical 0-60 times) People sometimes forget they depreciate less too so money spent initially is claimed back when you move the car on to the next owner.
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Old 03-27-2016, 04:24 AM   #59
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Update: Diesel disparity is only getting worse in US/Canada. The mid-size Chevrolet Colorado/ GMC Canyon introduction for 2015 model year was followed up with a great diesel prospect for 2016. But GM decided, as trollbait has suggested, that a really good opportunity for a right-powered diesel in this class would be used only as an opportunity for GM to gain some more margin.

GM made some progress reducing costs for a N. American diesel with this 2.8L I4 Duramax, employing the first solenoid injectors since clean diesel began in 2007 and a cast-iron block. The news was encouraging that these cost break throughs may result in an affordable, FE diesel in a modern small truck. That is until the
pricing and availability was announced. Instead of a mid-size 4 cylinder diesel planted in the configurations and trim levels that it would have been most suited for; a runaround, light-duty, high FE, mid-size truck for handy men, contractors, and commuters who need a truck for weekend projects and recreation; GM holds the diesel out for only the four full doors, the highest trim levels, and with every available feature as a max towing version.

So GM has put together a nice, well-designed, mid-size pickup duo that has a starting price at or about $22K, but the lowest-priced diesel version is at or about $34K. Not exactly an engine for the masses.
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Old 03-27-2016, 01:58 PM   #60
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I just dont get the logic there. Why is it so expensive to produce diesels there? Over here it's impossible to buy a truck or van with a gasoline engine, they don't exist at all. There's obviously a market there for such a thing, is it that they are just being super cautious with thier capitol these days, can't afford any gambles?
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