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Old 06-09-2017, 08:10 PM   #1
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I PREDICT, once battery tech delivers EVs with 300-400 driving range...

...car makers will offer the same model with a 150-200 mile driving range option.

It's the same as ICE cars offering engine upgrades.

Fewer batteries will make EVs more affordable and attractive to those that don't need long range for their daily commute. Heck. Perhaps you'll be able to customize your battery range entirely.

Perhaps, if you want to use your EV for a long distance trip, the dealer can "rent" you more batteries. Or, you just rent an EV with the long range capability.

Thoughts?
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Old 06-10-2017, 12:10 AM   #2
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I've got the "wait and see" attitude:
  • Today's EVs don't affect me.
  • Guessing about the future's EVs doesn't affect me.
  • What I think about EVs, current or future, doesn't affect them.

Spending brain cycles on this stuff is like arguing about how many angels can dance on the head of a pin.
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Old 06-10-2017, 02:33 AM   #3
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Depends on the tune.

Tesla already offers battery size options. The Ioniq Electric is getting a larger pack, so Hyundai might also be doing so.
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Old 06-10-2017, 04:44 AM   #4
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I have a feeling most people will opt for the longer range, and will be willing to pay more for the benefit. I mean how many people walk into a Ford showroom and buy the 2.3 ecoboost over the V8 Mustang? Probably not many. My car as standard had 250 bhp, but for 1600 more, you get bigger, lighter wheels, bigger brakes, a limited slip diff, massaging bucket seats, 20 bhp more etc. Peugeot then made all that standard on the gti as everyone opted for it anyway. It would be the same for EV's I would guess. Most people are willing to pay more to get more.
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Old 06-10-2017, 04:44 PM   #5
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The Gorilla in the room is the TCO for the battery option, but I agree with the "waste of brain use" in getting in another argument about whatever. I chose the option I'm presently taking and it's working perfectly for me, and that's all that really matters to me.
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Old 06-11-2017, 05:15 AM   #6
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But you're assuming the battery will need replacing, they are designed to last the life of the car and beyond. How many people keep a car until the most expensive part fails? Very few. It's the same with EV'S, most people change thier cars every 3-5 years, so the battery cost is something 99.9999% of people don't have to worry about.

The majority of ICE cars only have a 3 year warranty here, even the cheaper EV's have an 8 year warranty on the battery pack, not that that means the battery will only last 8 years. The average age of all cars in the UK is 7.4 years.
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Old 06-12-2017, 06:06 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Draigflag View Post
I have a feeling most people will opt for the longer range, and will be willing to pay more for the benefit. I mean how many people walk into a Ford showroom and buy the 2.3 ecoboost over the V8 Mustang? Probably not many. My car as standard had 250 bhp, but for 1600 more, you get bigger, lighter wheels, bigger brakes, a limited slip diff, massaging bucket seats, 20 bhp more etc. Peugeot then made all that standard on the gti as everyone opted for it anyway. It would be the same for EV's I would guess. Most people are willing to pay more to get more.
I expect the same, but Ford still offers that base V6 and that Ecoboost. It is going to come down to the actual price difference when the incentives are gone on whether a manufacture offers different battery options, and what the floor for shortest range will be.

Quote:
Originally Posted by R.I.D.E. View Post
The Gorilla in the room is the TCO for the battery option, but I agree with the "waste of brain use" in getting in another argument about whatever. I chose the option I'm presently taking and it's working perfectly for me, and that's all that really matters to me.
The latest report from UBS is predicting BEV to ICE TCO could reach parity in 2018.
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Old 06-13-2017, 11:13 PM   #8
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What's more likely is manufactures offering to retrofit larger capacity batteries as time goes on, like Renault do with the Zoe. Not sure of the upgrade cost, but any Zoe owner with an old 22 KW battery can have Renault fit them a 44 KW battery for a "fee" and a small increase in the monthly lease. In this respect, you pretty much double your range but not your monthly lease, and given you'll cut down on public charging which aren't free anymore either, it will probably save money in the long run.
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Old 06-14-2017, 04:42 AM   #9
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I can see that being the case in regards to battery leases, but battery leases have their own cons; mainly when it comes to resale.
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Old 06-14-2017, 09:10 AM   #10
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I'm on the fence with that one, knowing that you won't have to fork out on a new battery for a high mileage 10-15 year old EV might work in its favour. Older EV's with tired batteries might have lower resale values as some will assume the battery will need replacing sooner rather than later.
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