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Old 09-21-2015, 02:26 PM   #41
LDB
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If you hold the clutch in for extended time is that bad for the throw out bearing? Premature wear?
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Old 09-21-2015, 07:57 PM   #42
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You mean like dip the clutch to coast? In my car, and in most new cars I hear, it is more efficient to coast in gear as the engine uses no fuel. The coasting with dipped clutch fans argue you get more momentum, and this cancels out the small amount of fuel used with clutch depressed! I don't know about the mechanical wear and tear side of this.
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Old 09-21-2015, 10:44 PM   #43
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That's good going Ben. Approaching 18k in mine now, due it's first service/oil change in 3 weeks so hoping that will help, but getting over 70 MPG on this tank so far.

I still need to experiment as regards to the neutral theory, past few months I've been leaving it in gear, but as you say, the engine braking slows the car so you need to accelerate sooner. In neutral the car picks up speed quicker which means more braking, but maybe that's a good thing on car with regeneration braking? Ok I've decided, next tank it's going to be all neutral on every decline. Why not try the same Ben?
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Old 09-22-2015, 04:21 AM   #44
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Yes, pushing the clutch in for 20-30-60 seconds to coast down the mountain as opposed to the 1-2 seconds for changing gears. I presume there is wear associated with the throw out bearing when the clutch is depressed and none when it is released. I don't know for certain how it works though.
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Old 09-22-2015, 04:35 AM   #45
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I don't think there's any damage, I just tend to take the car out of gear and leave the clutch where it is until I need a gear again.
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Old 09-22-2015, 12:39 PM   #46
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Ha ha! I am afraid I didn't enjoy my experimental fortnight of rolling uncontrollably down hills in neutral...! That coasting in gear uses zero fuel and feels safer means I am unlikely to change. Though I can see how using dipped clutch sparingly and wisely may help, I mostly have the missus with me and she also disapproves. I've had a couple of 46 mpg tanks out of our CR-V recently, that was the average for my old diesel Rover 75, so chuffed with that. Will be sticking 2 new eco tyres on the back end of the Hyundai this week, original Handbooks need replacing at 31,000 miles.
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Old 09-22-2015, 03:08 PM   #47
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That was typed "hankooks" but changed to Handbooks...
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Old 09-22-2015, 10:42 PM   #48
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Haha. That's good mileage, I'm assuming you do a lot of motorway miles? Generally get about 14,000 out a set on mine (lots of bends) although I have in the past scrubbed a set at 3500 before. Be warned though, eco tyres give a harsh ride and can be noisy due to the hard rolling resistant compound they are made from, grip is slightly compromised too as there's less friction. I had eco-continetals on my old Panda.
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Old 09-23-2015, 02:25 PM   #49
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No motorway miles in the CR-V - ever! Hyundai has done no more than 1,500 motorway miles out of the 30,000 so far. Lots of hills. I just aim to drive as economically as possible. Scangauge has helped in the i20, and the CR-V has its own Scangauge.
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Old 09-23-2015, 02:33 PM   #50
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I stuck some eco tyres on the front earlier than necessary - probably 10,000 miles ago. They still had tread, but I wanted to check out eco tyres. Dunlop Bluresponse sports, 65 each. A rated for braking in the wet and B rated for economy (B rated is highest available rating for my tyre size, though you may be eligible for A rated). Can't say I get noticed any worse noise or grip than with my original Hankooks. I have lots of bends, but tend not to scrub or squeal, I take me smooth and steady as I can! I also slightly over inflate my tyres by 2-4 psi over the recommended pressure.
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