Block heater - Page 4 - Fuelly Forums

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View Poll Results: How many of you have a block heater?
I do 14 27.45%
I dont 18 35.29%
I might get one 19 37.25%
Voters: 51. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-11-2007, 09:57 PM   #31
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Even in warm weather...

Even in warm weather, the EBH helps get the engine in operating temp sooner -- an hour or 2 on the plug gets you to closed-loop sooner.

Granted, it does help even more in cold weather -- sometimes required to get going for those in extreme environs...

RH77
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Old 08-11-2007, 11:41 PM   #32
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im gonna go look at them later today to check prices and to see what types they have out.
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Old 08-12-2007, 06:24 AM   #33
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my ford came with it, tow package i guess, Eng block heater/extra cooler for trans/power steering/ big rear. the plug sits behind my bumper , i never used it. I did a few block heater installs, usually you drain all the coolant( pull the block plug too) uses a chisel and punch out one of the freeze plugs. the new heater is shaped like the freeze plug with a o-ring that seals the coolant, as you tighten the heater element it expands on the inside of the block sealing it tight. then just run the wire to the bumper where you can plug it in. I've seen on ford v8 diesels where you just remove a plug near the oil filter cooler and screw in a heater (nice and easy).
Just a note, I've heard of putting your defrosters on before you shut it off . Plug it in, the next day your windshield should have no frost/snow on it because of the coolant being above freezing and the natural air flow from heat rising, defrosts the windshield for your morning drive.
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Old 08-12-2007, 07:33 AM   #34
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Hmm, so most of these block heaters are actually inserted into the engine?

At work we have this thing that magneticly sticks to the side of used oil container and gets really hot to keep the oil from junking up at the bottom. I figured they would be more like that. Magneticly attach to your oil pan or something and heat her up...
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Old 08-12-2007, 08:45 AM   #35
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Types

Quote:
Originally Posted by baddog671 View Post
Hmm, so most of these block heaters are actually inserted into the engine?

At work we have this thing that magneticly sticks to the side of used oil container and gets really hot to keep the oil from junking up at the bottom. I figured they would be more like that. Magneticly attach to your oil pan or something and heat her up...
There are a few types...

I've heard of one that sticks into the oil dipstick, the magnetic one you mentioned, one that's inline with the coolant lines, and one that screws into the block. It depends on how much heat you need, ease of install, efficiency, etc. I went with the factory model -- a plug was unscrewed from the block, coolant drained, the heater (similar to a stove heating element) was screwed into the hole, then routed the cord to the front. This heats up the block and coolant together (maybe the auto-trans too depending on the heat transfer).

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Old 08-12-2007, 08:57 AM   #36
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There is also a pad type that has an adhesive backing that works well . It conforms and stays put even on odd shaped surfaces (contoured pans,transaxles etc) I'd venture to say it isn't quite as efficient as an internal heating element though . The dipstick style is one I'd recommend staying away from - too many reviews and complaints of cooked oil .
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Old 08-12-2007, 06:56 PM   #37
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I just checked my rangers freeze plug block heater with my kilowatt. 4.8amps 580watts thats like leaving a hair dryer on low setting. I think ill use the timer so its set for just an hour mabey 2hrs in the winter.
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Old 08-13-2007, 07:00 AM   #38
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For the Prius II the block heater draws about 400 watts.

Winter with a 3 hour plug-in, an outside ambient of 32F, the block will be at 115F. Normal MPG for the first five minutes would be 15-25MPG without the heater, 35-50MPG with the heater.

Summer with a 3 hour plug-in, an outside ambient of 70F, the block will be between 140-150F. Normal MPG for the first five minutes would be 25-35MPG without the heater, 45-65MPG with the heater.

Block heaters work year round to increase MPG.

Wayne
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Old 08-13-2007, 07:25 AM   #39
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I have an oem style block heater on my metro. It seems to help .
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Old 08-13-2007, 09:49 AM   #40
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Originally Posted by FireEngineer View Post
For the Prius II the block heater draws about 400 watts.

Winter with a 3 hour plug-in, an outside ambient of 32F, the block will be at 115F. Normal MPG for the first five minutes would be 15-25MPG without the heater, 35-50MPG with the heater.

Summer with a 3 hour plug-in, an outside ambient of 70F, the block will be between 140-150F. Normal MPG for the first five minutes would be 25-35MPG without the heater, 45-65MPG with the heater.

Block heaters work year round to increase MPG.

Wayne
Just a remark. In summer, the car wont take the same time to heat up. So I think the first 5 minutes isnt quite exact period of time. In winter, in real cold wheater (-15 or -20 degree) its about up to 10min to warm it up. But in summer, it might take, 3-4 min MAX.

Anayway I don't think I will ever use the block heater in summer, I just take care of pushing the pedal the less possible and to take it easy on the engine, and the MPG.
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