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Old 08-29-2007, 04:47 PM   #1
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expanding gas and fillups

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Old 08-29-2007, 05:45 PM   #2
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also... 99% of all gas stations have LARGE UNDERGROUND tanks, it takes a LOT to change the temp of the gas in the storage tanks.... as some of you may have noticed the gas going through the handle cools it off significantly

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Old 08-29-2007, 06:05 PM   #3
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also... 99% of all gas stations have LARGE UNDERGROUND tanks, it takes a LOT to change the temp of the gas in the storage tanks.... as some of you may have noticed the gas going through the handle cools it off significantly

Jeff
True! The gaz is usally stored in the ground, and the temperature is real different then in the surface. Good point never though about that Jeff.
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Old 08-29-2007, 09:03 PM   #4
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As said, fuel is stored underground. And if you're in the United States at a modern station, there's a rather large concrete pad over it. The only differences will occur if your area has longer periods of drastic temp change (such as large summer/winter temp differences). The difference between morning and midday are rather insignificant.

I'm currently in central Florida - when I fuel up, I can feel the metal joints on the nozzle get cold any time during the day/night. The same happens in south Florida

If you're in Canada, no worries - there's a fuel density sensor to compensate (or so I've been told)
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Old 08-30-2007, 06:24 AM   #5
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Around here the air pollution folks have asked us to fuel in the evening. reduces ground level ozone.
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Old 08-30-2007, 05:43 PM   #6
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Yes, that is true. Since gas is stored underground, the temperature doesn't fluxuate much, but it should stay under 60F. Gas station owners have been caught warming it up a bit to reduce the actual amount coming out..

There are random screenings where an official will collect samples and test them to find these kinds of things..
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Old 08-30-2007, 05:53 PM   #7
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If you take a reasonable guess at the temperature of the fuel in the tank, and look at the coefficient of expansion of gasoline, you'll likely find that there probably won't be a large enough difference to matter. For instance, over a 100F difference in temperature, 10 gallons of gasoline when cold would be 10.3 gallons when hot. I'm guessing that most underground gas tanks swing over maybe 30-40 degrees, so the difference between 10 gallons at the coldest time in winter and at the warmest in summer is probably no greater than .1 gallon, or 1%. It's more than the pump's supposed maximum margin of error at .5%, but not much more. And if you're comparing fills during the day/night of the same season, probably less than the pump's error.
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Old 08-30-2007, 08:06 PM   #8
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Thermal expansion can be a huge factor. Pumping in the morning helps prevent your paid for fuel from evaporating out the tank.

Stations are supposed to be selling 60F gallons but in South Louisiana that happens maybe two months a year... So the gas is normally pumped above 60F.
Since the gas pump metering element is a positive displacement meter when the gas is over 60F the station makes money by selling you less fuel than indicated.
In Canada I've read the pumps are temperature compensated since the looser would be the station owners due to the ground temp being below 60F. It would be a simple matter for stations to add temp compensation though.

In the petroleum industry all sales by volume are also temperature and pressure compensated by published ASTM tables. That or there done by direct mass measurement. Its worth big dollars!
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Old 08-31-2007, 02:50 PM   #9
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Morning fillups do yield more, but it's not a whole lot more. 950x10^-6 at 20C for instance. So for every 15F difference in temperature there's about a 1% difference in energy. But, this only a concern from the perspective of the 60F standard, the average consumer won't see anywhere near that difference if they fill in the morning compared to the afternoon.
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It is possible that buying gas early in the morning, before fuel is delivered, may result in gas that is a few degrees cooler.
A few degree difference may result in an extra .2% more energy per gallon, but since the pump could be off by as much as .5%, depending on state, the difference is probably well within any normal variation you may see between fills.
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Pumps cannot be off by more than 3.3 ounces in a five-gallon test. That?s a 0.5-percent margin of error
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Old 08-31-2007, 04:40 PM   #10
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With those HUUUUUGE tanks, even a .1% difference could add up real fast.

BTW, this should be extremely easy to test. Get a soda bottle of gas, mark it, put it in the fridge, mark it again, put it in the sun, mark it again. Empty it and figure out the volume...
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