Radiator blocking drawback - Page 2 - Fuelly Forums

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Old 11-01-2009, 04:27 PM   #11
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OK you are getting close but what they all were suggesting is to cut a hole in the plastic you used to block the radiator not cut the radiator itself. My advice is this. Stand in front of the car with the bonnet open find what ever side has the fan on the back of the radiator. remove some of the grille block on that side. drive happy.
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Old 11-01-2009, 05:15 PM   #12
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my theory is that some part of your radiator needs to be unblock to insure proper cooling, having your pipes burst due to pressure is a bad thing(your hot enough to be in blown head/ block territory , first replace the hose, second keep at least a 1/4 of the radiator unblocked, unless you want to crack your head

on my car at prime with wai i had only 2/3 covered 1/3 was exposed and with the wai i only noticed a slight increase in temp increase speed. the velocity at which the tempurature is increasing with is more a rate than anything... so anything much more than that would be way too fast thats why I say 1/4 as a possibly agreeable number, make sure your cooling fan is working too or build a switch for it off a relay if it isn't(worst case scenario)...

i use my old ac condensor as a radiator block currently
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Old 11-02-2009, 05:48 PM   #13
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on my car at prime with wai i had only 2/3 covered 1/3 was exposed and with the wai i only noticed a slight increase in temp increase speed. the velocity at which the tempurature is increasing with is more a rate than anything... so anything much more than that would be way too fast thats why I say 1/4 as a possibly agreeable number, make sure your cooling fan is working too or build a switch for it off a relay if it isn't(worst case scenario)...
The cooling fan is working properly. It starts working when the temperature reaches 197.6 F. However, it doesn't cool down the engine efficiently (or doesn't cool it down at all) when the radiator is 100% blocked. I'll follow your suggestion and I will unblock part of the radiator.
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Old 11-03-2009, 06:55 PM   #14
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Yes openings in those yellow areas are the correct locations - on the other side of course. You want the openings where the fan blades are since that is where the air is pulled through the radiator. It is also a good idea to NOT put the radiator block material against the radiator . . . why? . . . how much force is a 60 mph or greater wind going to push on the blocking material and against the radiator which is designed to pass air through it. Also you want air to be able to flow through the radiator where the fan is when the fan turns on . . . you can block several inches in front of the radiator but allow the fan to pull air through as much of the radiator as possible when it needs to cool it. Allow air to flow around the radiator block from below etc when the fan runs.
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Old 11-04-2009, 02:46 PM   #15
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Yes openings in those yellow areas are the correct locations - on the other side of course. You want the openings where the fan blades are since that is where the air is pulled through the radiator. It is also a good idea to NOT put the radiator block material against the radiator . . . why? . . . how much force is a 60 mph or greater wind going to push on the blocking material and against the radiator which is designed to pass air through it. Also you want air to be able to flow through the radiator where the fan is when the fan turns on . . . you can block several inches in front of the radiator but allow the fan to pull air through as much of the radiator as possible when it needs to cool it. Allow air to flow around the radiator block from below etc when the fan runs.
OK, I'll make the necessary changes.

It may look that the cardboard is against the radiator, but it's not. There's a metal structure that separates the radiator and the front bumper.
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Old 11-04-2009, 05:12 PM   #16
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why not cover the grill itself in the bumper. instead of blocking off the radiator at all. that way you get double duty out of the block. you get the advantage of the wind not coming through and cooling you down but you also get the aerodynamic advantage as well. if the fan comes on, it can still pull air from below.

I would still recommend only blocking a portion and not the entire thing. coroplast doesn't look that bad on the front of a car and you can cut it with scisors or a razor knife easily. coroplast is the stuff that signs are made of that people stick in their yards (mostly political signs during election seasons)
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Old 11-04-2009, 05:38 PM   #17
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That rusty mess around that hose in the picture looks like it should be changed completely. Coolant will not cool properly unless its a proper mix and not full of rust.

If the coolant fan will not cool it off fairly quickly you might consider cleaning or replacing the radiator itself. As they get old their capacity to cool reduces to the point where they will not cool enough.

Also monitor your coolant level closely, to make sure you are not loosing coolant, which would indicate some problem like a bad head gasket.

That coolant residue around that hose looks nasty.

regards
Gary
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