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Old 08-22-2006, 07:37 AM   #1
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runflat tires

sorry if i'm repeating previously discussed issues, i've been reading some old threads, but haven't gotten too far back as there is quite a bit of material (you guys think you are james joyce or something?)

anyway, has anyone replaced their normal tires with runflats? i assume that using runflats would negate the need to carry the spare (and it's weight) around with you everywhere you go.

if so, are they expensive? do they function the same as any other tire?

i'm just wondering if the cost would justify the gains.
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Old 08-22-2006, 07:41 AM   #2
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Good question. And would a can of pressurized puncture repair be the poor man's equivalent of run-flat? It wouldn't help in the event of a big blow-out, but when's the last time that happened to anyone who keeps an eye on their tire pressures?

If I'm not mistaken, a couple of newer non-runflat cars have such kits, rather than spares on board.
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Old 08-22-2006, 07:45 AM   #3
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Pontiac Solstice, Honda Accord hybrid have repair kits rather than spares:

No spare tire.... opinions? - Pontiac Solstice Forum
http://www.solsticeforum.com/forum/s...ad.php?t=20789

2005 Honda Accord Hybrid Review
http://www.theautochannel.com/news/2...08/033064.html
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Old 08-22-2006, 07:46 AM   #4
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i had a can of puncture repair that didnt' work, it might have been an old can,so i would be a bit leary about going straight to the can rather than a spare.

the other thing i didn't think about was the weight of runflats, they might be heavier than a normal tire as they are reinforced on the sidewalls (i think anyway)
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Old 08-22-2006, 07:50 AM   #5
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I would go for the runflat repair goop-in-a-can, but also carry a small 12V compressor. You can pick them up at CDN Tire on sale for about 8 bucks. I have one, and can vouch for its ability to get my tire up to the 50 psi range. Still lighter than carrying a spare.
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Old 08-22-2006, 08:00 AM   #6
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i'll look into that,

what do you do in the case of a flat? do you spray in the goop, then get the tire up to pressure with the compressor?
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Old 08-22-2006, 08:04 AM   #7
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I think so, but I'm not sure. Perhaps a bit more investigation is in order - ie. find out what's in the Honda & Pontiac kits. Feel like doing a bit more web searching? (I gotta get back to work!)

I suspect the manufacturers don't mind putting said kits into higher end cars because they don't expect the driver to do anything more than call roadside assistance anyway, and let the tow truck driver sort it all out.
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Old 08-22-2006, 08:09 AM   #8
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work? oh yeah, i've got to do some of that myself, but i will definitely spend some time looking into this when i get a chance,

thanks for the info!
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Old 08-22-2006, 08:18 AM   #9
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Last comment (!): my space saver spare & jack weigh 24 lbs together - the single heaviest item(s) that can be easily removed from the car.

A 12V mini compressor weighs 1 or 2 lbs, and the goop is of course lighter than that.
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Old 08-22-2006, 09:05 AM   #10
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Here's my thoughts:

My friend just got a new mini cooper (he's actually not a spoiled, rich kid; we're pretty sure his dad bought it for him now because he'll be gone to college in a week and then he gets to drive it for 4 years) and he's so uptight about the run-flats. I told him when I drove I was going to do a burnout all the way down his street and he was freaking out. But anyway, the point is that I think the way they're built will mean that LRRs + jack will always be better than sticky tires and no jack.

However, I'd rather just pick up a tyre repair kit with the little strip of rubber and some rubber cement and a can of fix-a-flat to put the juice back in and call it a day. I've repaired so many freaking tires I could prolly still make it to wherever I was going on time,
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