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Android Users - Coming Soon! - Migrating from aCar 4.8 to 5.0

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Old 05-10-2009, 11:32 AM   #201
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220 water temp... steady? That's putting a lot of unneccesary heat stress on your engine. My cooling systems is 100% functional and operational and it runs 198*F when driving after warmup and hits 210-212*F in traffic, the fans turn on and it cools back down to 204-206*F. I wouldn't feel comfortable running my engine at 220*F all the time.

And yes, your $175 "intercooler" was a horrible idea. You could've gotten a junkyard heater core for $5 and done the same thing.
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Old 05-10-2009, 01:20 PM   #202
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Mercedes service bulletins stated clearly that their engines could run at sustained coolant temps as high as 256 degrees without damage, as long as the antifreeze percentages were correct.

regards
gary
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Old 07-11-2009, 08:07 PM   #203
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Did This With A 94 Sl2 And Got 45 Mpg<-!

Right Now A 99 Sl2 39 Mpg At 65mph Not Hai But Warmer Had To Swap Out For The Back Side Of The Intake Box The Intake Was Taking In Water From The Guy Who Riced The Car Before Me Ripping Apart The Fender/panel Lol.
The Water Rusted Out My California Emission Air Pump Piping Just Did Aerodynamics Mods Over Fog Light Holes Will Post ResultS

5spd With Mobil 1 Synthetic Btw
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Old 12-03-2009, 06:34 PM   #204
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#
[PDF]
BURNER DESIGN PARAMETER FOR FLUE GAS NOx CONTROL
Tests on gas turbines
developed for the automobile in the early 1960's
indicated that NOx emissions were lower on warm,
humid days as opposed to cold, dry days. Also, in the
case of gas turbines, water is injected to limit the
formation of the NOx in the combustion process.
johnzink.com/products/burners/pdfs/tp_burn_dez_params.pdf

also maybe you think nox would be too high on a warm intake system cause nova
misquoted this article where the cause of high NOx was a bad 02 sensor causing this car to run lean..
http://www.asashop.org/autoinc/oct2004/techtips.htm

NOx is generally the result of really high temperature exhaust(my edit: caused by clogged cat, not letting exhaust gas escape, not a warm air intake). Being the son of a mechanic, it is difficult for me to say what is beyond the scope of most individuals. I would richen the mixture slightly to lower temperatures, or advance the timing slightly. I think that will cool the engine down enough. A 30 minute run on the highway straight onto the test dyno would likely help if you can arrange it.

http://ask.metafilter.com/39612/How-...-NOx-emissions

wouldnt a warm air intake reduce exhaust temps somewhat by pulling air over the exhaust???

The technician installed a new O2 sensor and started the vehicle. Within a minute or two we had proper closed loop operation, and when he test drove the vehicle, he had vacuum to the EGR valve and the NOx failure was repaired.

running lean will cause high nox

if youre worried about nox, then DONT drive a deisel






Quote:
Originally Posted by R.I.D.E. View Post
Better mileage=lower emissions.
Not always. If too lean you get higher NOx emissions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by R.I.D.E. View Post
Warmer air=better atomization
That was true for carbureted cars that didn't atomize fuel well. That's not the case with fuel injected car where fuel atomization is much better.

also:
70 C is close to 160 F. They found that past that knock could become a problem and BSFC would go back up a bit.


and i believe this works better in MAP systems and not MAF systems
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Old 12-04-2009, 05:16 AM   #205
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spotaneagle View Post
#
[PDF]
BURNER DESIGN PARAMETER FOR FLUE GAS NOx CONTROL
Tests on gas turbines
developed for the automobile in the early 1960's
indicated that NOx emissions were lower on warm,
humid days as opposed to cold, dry days. Also, in the
case of gas turbines, water is injected to limit the
formation of the NOx in the combustion process.
johnzink.com/products/burners/pdfs/tp_burn_dez_params.pdf

also maybe you think nox would be too high on a warm intake system cause nova
misquoted this article where the cause of high NOx was a bad 02 sensor causing this car to run lean..
http://www.asashop.org/autoinc/oct2004/techtips.htm

NOx is generally the result of really high temperature exhaust(my edit: caused by clogged cat, not letting exhaust gas escape, not a warm air intake). Being the son of a mechanic, it is difficult for me to say what is beyond the scope of most individuals. I would richen the mixture slightly to lower temperatures, or advance the timing slightly. I think that will cool the engine down enough. A 30 minute run on the highway straight onto the test dyno would likely help if you can arrange it.

http://ask.metafilter.com/39612/How-...-NOx-emissions

wouldnt a warm air intake reduce exhaust temps somewhat by pulling air over the exhaust???

The technician installed a new O2 sensor and started the vehicle. Within a minute or two we had proper closed loop operation, and when he test drove the vehicle, he had vacuum to the EGR valve and the NOx failure was repaired.

running lean will cause high nox

if youre worried about nox, then DONT drive a deisel






Quote:
Originally Posted by R.I.D.E. View Post
Better mileage=lower emissions.
Not always. If too lean you get higher NOx emissions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by R.I.D.E. View Post
Warmer air=better atomization
That was true for carbureted cars that didn't atomize fuel well. That's not the case with fuel injected car where fuel atomization is much better.

also:
70 C is close to 160 F. They found that past that knock could become a problem and BSFC would go back up a bit.


and i believe this works better in MAP systems and not MAF systems
As the son of a B17 pilot, that does not make me a qualified B17 pilot spotaneagle.

You still seem to have this propensity to inject words into my statements to try to slant the meaning.

Warm air reduces NOX
Better mileage reduces NOX.

Never said anything about running lean, so you need to stay within the contents of my quote or your priorities become obvious (trying to refute my statements for whatever reason).

In fact if HCCI is ever developed to the point of practicality, then your assumption about lean mixtures causing NOX would also be WRONG.

LEAN MIXTURES AND POOR ATOMIZATION CREATE NOX. HCCI addresses incomplete combustion under lean conditions by thoroughly emulsifying the mixture, while virtually eliminating NOX.

That's a lean mixture without excess NOX. In fact virtually no NOX.

Get it right son.

Now lets look at warm air induction. Take it to the reverse extreme, very cold air. As incoming air temperatures drop, fuel atomization is affected. Think 40 below 0, or even lower. At some point in lower temperatures the fine droplets of fuel injected into the engine will not completely vaporize and incomplete combustion will occur. Since incomplete combustion occurs at any temperature (demonstrated by the gains in efficiency of HCCI and the significant funding and research in developing practical HCCI systems) YOUR assumption that lean mixtures directly affect NOX is also flawed.

Lean mixtures and imperfect homogenization of the mixture create NOX. HCCI clearly proves that lean mixtures alone do not cause NOX spikes. Lean mixtures combined with imperfect homogenization do cause NOX increases.

Do the necessary research, and then refute my statements, or try just presenting the facts and let the readers draw their own conclusions.

regards
Gary
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