my experience with heated fuel/vapor carb - Page 3 - Fuelly Forums

Android Users - Coming Soon! - Migrating from aCar 4.8 to 5.0

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-15-2008, 05:29 PM   #21
Site Team / Moderator
 
Jay2TheRescue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 4,657
Country: United States
Location: Northern Virginia
RW, I'm curious to see what type of gains you'd get, if any.

-Jay
__________________

__________________






Jay2TheRescue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2008, 07:54 AM   #22
Registered Member
 
flapdoodle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 183
Country: United States
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoadWarrior View Post
Strange, they should just be piezo elements like the beepers in the back of watches, but driven by a higher frequency, can't see why distilled water would not work.
I found a few answers here:
http://www.cjjplumbing.com/Misting_Fountain_Article.htm

"you can use distilled water with just a few crystals of standard table salt added. The dissolved salt will add the necessary conductivity to the water without adding the unwanted minerals."

"The disk can wear out faster if the water used is highly mineralized or aromatherapy oils are use frequently."

I will assume that gasoline would reduce the resonator life just as oils do.
__________________

flapdoodle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2008, 02:02 PM   #23
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 11
Country: United States
"i do have to say that before i got married, the most entertaining project that i built was a carburetor, and it had no floats, no valves, no jets, nothing to meter the gas flow. it did however have 2 fuel pumps, one in and one out...etc." This has been on the I-net for years. While this guys experiment with "elephant diapers" and an ammo can demonstrates that vaporised gasoline burns far more efficiently than liquid gasoline, his, and any other "wicking" system, won't work LONG TERM. He only did it for a short time. What he was doing was vaporising the lighter elements in the gas.If he had tried to run his truck for a week or 2, he would have found his 'elephant diapers' and the ammo can would have gotten clogged up with stuff that looks like coffee, smells like old gas, and won't vaporise off the wick. (Unless he had a way to return the gas in the "carb" to the tank after each run, in which case the gas in his tank would have gotten "gunked up".Gasoline is not 1 substance, in the way that say,... pure alcohol or acetone is. Its many different substances, mixed or "blended" together. Some vaporise very readily, some do not.Some of the heavier portions are hydrocarbons (derived from the original crude) and some are additives.Such a system might work if you are willing to run your car off Coleman fuel, @ $8.00-$10.00/gallon.
These "heavier" less easily vaporised fractions are the portion of the gas that ends up in the combustion chamber, as a liquid, and only vaporise after the high temp of combustion, and add nothing in terms of power to the car. Some are trying Catalyctic "Cracking", using extemely high heat, over 1000 degrees, styeam and exposure to catalysts to crack the larger heavier molecules into smaller ones, similar to what the oil company does. I am sceptical that this is practical, operating a mini refinery while going down the road.Also, no ones given me a good answer as to why, the oil companies don't do this, if its practical. i.e. "crack" all the heavy elements into lighter ones, then add cheap (heavy)additives as "fillers".Anyway, the point I'm trying to make is don't waste your time looking for mister stones, or trying to modify airbrushes, until you figure out how to deal with the heavier, less-easily-vaporised elements.Or, you'll end up with stuff that smells like old gas, and looks like coffee, in your tank, and/or fuel system. Jim
dutchdivco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2008, 02:53 PM   #24
Registered Member
 
Jetta90GL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 75
Country: United States
I have to agree with the vapor type carbs leaving a useless old smelling gas in the tank. I built a "Geet Reactor" on one of my push mowers. To my amazement it would fire right up, but to use it to mow lawn was real troublesome after the tank started to get low. I would have to add a splash of new gas to keep it running. One difference with the "Geet" was they claim it converted hydrocarbons and water into hydrogen, which apparently mine didn't work as claimed.
__________________

Jetta90GL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2008, 07:02 PM   #25
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 110
Country: United States
Here's some history on heated intakes.

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/..._needle20.html
1959 Opel T-1 get's 376mpg in 1973 sponsored by Shell Oil

You can find this elsewhere also.
__________________
http://www.maxxgraphix.net
maxxgraphix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2008, 07:15 PM   #26
Registered Member
 
GasSavers_Erik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 1,027
Country: United States
Quote:
Originally Posted by maxxgraphix View Post
Here's some history on heated intakes.

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/..._needle20.html
1959 Opel T-1 get's 376mpg in 1973 sponsored by Shell Oil

You can find this elsewhere also.
Interesting setup- in the closeup, there appears to be no transmission- it just looks like a sprocket running off the end of a shaft stuck through the bell housing. A bearing is on the outer end of the bell housing and then another is mounted behind the driver's seat.
GasSavers_Erik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2008, 07:28 PM   #27
Registered Member
 
GasSavers_Erik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 1,027
Country: United States
Wow- very interesting pics of the actual car from http://www.opel-p1.nl/custom/testcar/Shell%20Opel.htm

Check out the insulated engine- it looks like the carb is sucking air from the top of the valve cover. I cant imagine how hot is must get under that insulation.




its a two speed- Chain slides from sprocket to sprocket
Front:

Rear:


Front axle:
GasSavers_Erik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2008, 03:20 AM   #28
Registered Member
 
Cruzedriver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 77
Country: United States
that is cool some one should def try to mimic thisidea and see if it could work over an extended period i really doubt the engine life.. if its always running so hot
__________________
Cruzedriver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2008, 08:51 AM   #29
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 6
Country: United States
its funny how as more and more of these near urban ledgends (100mpg carbs and 300mpg cars or Smokey's 60mpg 300 horse power Fiaro etc.) we discover more and more why they were left to rot, and not developed further. And its got nothing to do with corporate greed and conspiracys.

Gasoline varnish (casual name for it). And fiberglass insulated engines.

Imagine trying to warrentee that engine? What are the prospects of a 400 to 500 degree running temp engine having a bearing life beyond a couple thousand miles? If its running anywhere close to exhaust gas temps then it's exceeding even synthetic oil's ability to withstand viscosity breakdown. If you run an oil cooler or three you defeat the purpose of the insulation in keeping as much combustion temp inside the chambers as possible.

Peak temps would be even higher, but 400 degrees sustained will soften (anneal) almost any bearing material over a long drive. Peak temps (temps at the bearings are much higher than the operating overall temp of an engine) could easilly exceed the melting point of most bearing materials.

And then there's gas varnish left from vaporizing gas at high temps... Guess where this stuff sits and collects? Anywhere where the temp got high enough to vaporize it; that's where... So it's either collecting in the tank (best case for it too) or filling up the intake, or stopping up your fuel lines, or its quickly clogging up your carburetor OR your fuel injectors...

The only place it will burn is inside the cumbustion chamber... And guess where that leaves vapor fuel systems? right back at square one pretty much, carbs and fuel injectors.

Now I';m not saying these problems are insurmountable... Not by a long shot... vaporize the gas and inject the varnish with MPFI... but do you get a net gain when the vapor is remixed with the varnish?

As an aside has anyone here ever taken apart a old worn engine or carb that sat for a long time? Gas varnish is some of the most stubborn gummy re-congealing substances ever... wash it in Acetone and it liquefies. But if you dont scrub and wipe it off fast enough, it hardens back up into a rubber cement like gel and you have to do it all over again. It even gums back up with brake cleaner! Nasty stuff
1bolt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2008, 10:43 AM   #30
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,111
Country: United States
Send a message via AIM to dkjones96
I've read that, in plane piston engines anyways, that an engine firing gasoline runs better when the fuel enters the cylinder as very tiny droplets as opposed to a complete vapor.
__________________

__________________
- Kyle
dkjones96 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
More metric unit options bem Fuelly Web Support and Community News 1 04-23-2011 01:25 PM
Share Data With Friends (Facebook, etc) Saiyaman156 Fuelly Web Support and Community News 4 09-17-2008 09:45 AM
Three Laws of Fuel Economy Ernie Rogers General Fuel Topics 6 05-22-2008 08:08 PM
Getting interested in saving gas phantomcow2 Introduce Yourself - New member Welcome 5 08-04-2007 09:58 PM
New Members! Tell us about yourself! Matt Timion Introduce Yourself - New member Welcome 7 06-01-2007 06:51 AM

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 05:35 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.