Warm Air Intakes - Page 2 - Fuelly Forums
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Old 02-22-2008, 02:27 PM   #11
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kame, I think we're agreeing; To reach stoich it takes more fuel with dense, cold air, and less fuel with less dense, warm air. And I wasn't arguing with your method of fooling the ECU by relocating the IAT sensor to a warmer place. I was merely replying to Snax' comment that more throttle = more fuel when using WAI (less dense air).

In addition to the better atomization benefit Snax mentioned, the other theoretical benefit of WAI is the wider throttle opening, required to allow the same amount of air into the engine, reduces pumping losses.

Roll on,

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Old 03-22-2008, 02:07 PM   #12
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Relocating Temp sending unit

I'm having a hard time getting plumbing to go my way and can not get a warm air system into the truck. But my next plan is going to be to move the sensor to someplace warm. This should work as it has been discussed earlier, but then I go a step further and ask this question of the board members here:

A sensor is just a resistor to electrical current. Why not bypass that and add an adjustable resistor inside the cab to adjust when you want it to what you want it. Say I'm driving to and from work and could use the "smaller engine" factor and turn up the sensor to "trick" the truck into thinking it was really warm out side. Then coming home, I hook up the snowmobile trailer and want to haul it...down with the temp and up with the full pony potential (it's a dodge, not a lot of potential). Kinda like a dial-a-miliage. What do you think?


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Old 03-22-2008, 02:19 PM   #13
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You just re-invented the eBay $19.95 "performance chip"...

Intake air temperature sensor fooling does work to a certain extent. But the ECU will more often base values on what it sees on the O2 sensor, and when the numbers don't agree with data from several sensors, it will mark the sensor bad and use default values.
I remember The RoadWarrior..To understand who he was, you have to go back to another time..the world was powered by the black fuel & the desert sprouted great cities..Gone now, swept away..two mighty warrior tribes went to war & touched off a blaze which engulfed them all. Without fuel, they were nothing..thundering machines sputtered & stopped..Only those mobile enough to scavenge, brutal enough to pillage would survive. The gangs took over the highways, ready to wage war for a tank of juice
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Old 03-22-2008, 03:33 PM   #14
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Ohh, never thought of that...I'm asking $24.95 (inflation) ! I was also thinking if used with a scanguage, you'd be able to see what the computer thought was the intake temp instead of reading a voltage resistance you could see the actual conversion. I think this would keep you from going too high in "temp" thus keeping it a realized benifit rather than using the defaults. Any more on this would really help my sanity, I sometimes get really obsessed with these things until I test them!
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Old 03-23-2008, 03:01 AM   #15
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Go back and read Snax's post again.

Warm air & gas burn more efficiently. Efficiency = MPG.

The only time that cold air will help is when you are trying to cram as much air (and fuel) into the cylinder as possible for maximum HP, like on the dragstrip. For the other 99.9% of driving, you are more interested in extracting as much energy from a given amount of fuel as possible, and therefore the warmer air & fuel burn more efficiently & completely.

"Fooling" the ECM is just going to move you away from stoich. Running lean is not necessarily more efficient. You might inject less air per volume of gasoline, but since it runs less efficiently you'll have to allow more air (and gas) into the engine to make up for it.

-Bob C.
Think you are saving gas? Prove it by starting a Gas Log, then conduct a proper experiment.
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Old 03-23-2008, 10:30 AM   #16
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So plumbing is the answer...plumbing in warm air rather than "tricking" the computer. Seems to me if you could "trick" both the AIS and the O2 sensor, you may have a chance at it. I think this would require two resistors (maybe 3 because I have one on each bank of my V8) and the coordination may be more difficult than piping in warm air. Some more thought required!!!

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