Fuelly Forums

Fuelly Forums (http://www.fuelly.com/forums/)
-   General Fuel Topics (http://www.fuelly.com/forums/f8/)
-   -   Thermal Management of Oil and Trans Fluid... (http://www.fuelly.com/forums/f8/thermal-management-of-oil-and-trans-fluid-11643.html)

dosco 07-21-2009 09:22 AM

Thermal Management of Oil and Trans Fluid...
 
Interesting article: http://www.designnews.com/article/27...el_Mileage.php

I wonder if it will become commercially successful?

GasSavers_RoadWarrior 07-21-2009 10:57 AM

Not quite sure why he's saying the old thermostat is "analog" it's either on or it's off, it's digital with one bit resolution.

What he means is he wants close to fully analog control from a high resolution digital system.

However, if you can find them, you can put in a Stant progressive thermostat.... forget the name of them. can never find the buggers round here when I am into the thermostat.

bobc455 07-21-2009 04:10 PM

I've been trying to find someone to make me a controlled thermostat, so I can run hot on the highway and cold on the track (without having to spend an hour under the hood inbetween to change t-stats).

-Bob C.

R.I.D.E. 07-21-2009 04:46 PM

We discussed this here before.

Two thermostats, one in the normal position, the second mixing coolant from the radiator and a bypass circuit to maintain the coolant at 110 degrees when it enters the engine.

Coolant exiting the radiator in winter can be very cold which conducts more heat from the cylinders and cylinder head.

Same as a controllable radiator block that would do the same thing.

8% milege increase in winter sounds right. In summer the coolant exiting the radiator is already in the desirable range, since the radiator will not remove as much heat when ambient temperatures are above 85 degrees.

regards
gary

dosco 07-22-2009 01:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by R.I.D.E. (Post 138436)
We discussed this here before.

Two thermostats, one in the normal position, the second mixing coolant from the radiator and a bypass circuit to maintain the coolant at 110 degrees when it enters the engine.

Coolant exiting the radiator in winter can be very cold which conducts more heat from the cylinders and cylinder head.

Same as a controllable radiator block that would do the same thing.

8% milege increase in winter sounds right. In summer the coolant exiting the radiator is already in the desirable range, since the radiator will not remove as much heat when ambient temperatures are above 85 degrees.

regards
gary

Links to threads? Or suggestion regarding search terms?

R.I.D.E. 07-22-2009 05:07 PM

dosco,

I believe it was in a thread on radiator blocks, but it could have been under warm air intakes.

The thoughts were in the direction of what causes the large differences in fuel mileage between winter and summer temperatures.

My position was if you could control the temperature of the incoming air and the incoming radiator coolant you would go a long way toward mitigating the losses when operating a vehicle in winter compared to summer.

While those two changes would not eliminate all of the mileage differences, in my opinion it would eliminate most of the differences if you could duplicate summer operating temperatures of both incoming air and incoming coolant, in wintertime.

Maybe HC could locate the thread but it could take al lot of searching, which is why I posted the major points I made in that prior thread.

regards
gary

regards
gary

theholycow 07-22-2009 05:52 PM

I think this is the thread in question:
http://www.gassavers.org/showthread....783#post137783


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 05:47 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.