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Old 03-11-2007, 01:47 AM   #31
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Lug_Nut -

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Didn't they make it? That picture has a lot of cues that made me thinking it was a prototype that ended up as the Aussie-built Mercury XR-2 that we had for a few years.
*sigh*.

What you say makes sense, but what I heard was, the XR2 was the deformed progeny of the Ford Barchetta :



Notice the "hood bumps"? On the Barchetta they were functional because that was where the shocks were. The XR2 adopted them.

Now I am thinking, maybe the XR2 was the bastard son of both of these cars.

The XR2 was a nice car on it's own terms, but just look at what it could have been!!!!!!

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Old 03-17-2007, 08:27 AM   #32
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Looks similar to the Honda Beat
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Old 03-17-2007, 09:10 AM   #33
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NEVs will never be popular without the ability to travel at least 40-45 MPH. There is no major metropolitan area where even the local feeder streets would allow travel at 25 mph, rendering NEVs useless for anything more than circling the block. To get ANYWHERE in my town, we need to use a minimum of a 35 zone.
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Old 03-17-2007, 10:36 AM   #34
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I've been wondering for a few days about this. How much grief to you get for owning that truck in a town like Eugene? Is it still the eco-anarchist hub that it was in the 90's, or has that changed?
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Old 03-18-2007, 08:11 AM   #35
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We have all types here - including way to many rednecks that think they need a pickup just because. Then of course there was the guy who torched a lot full of SUVs and pickups. He's a complete tool by failing to realize that the majority of the public just wrote him off as a nut, and that the automakers would just make more of them to replace what he destroyed. The only people that got screwed were insurance company shareholders.

Anyway, we do have a semi-local guy with the right idea about NEVs. He's the former manufacturer of the NEVCo Gizmo that is reapproaching this niche with the BugE. It's too bad that he has to limit the vehicle to 3 wheels, but that lends itself well to lightweight design and allows the higher speeds without crash testing. (People just need to realize that they are as imperiled by stupid drivers as much as any motorcyclist when driving one.)
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Old 03-18-2007, 04:06 PM   #36
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If you're talking about Jeff "Free" Luers, then I would say that the only person who got screwed was him. Twenty three years for causing $40k of damage is ridiculous. That's more than most murderers, thieves, rapists and kidnappers get. The SUV's were later refurbished and sold.

I do think that destroying the SUV's in this fashion was wrong. For starters, most of the public at that time didn't really care very much about the environment. This was before most people started believing the truth about global warming. Secondly, and more importantly, it was counterproductive because he spewed more toxic chemicals into the atmosphere than would have if he just defaced them or found a better way to render them useless. Regardless though, 23 years is just obscene for a few silly SUV's.
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Old 03-18-2007, 09:26 PM   #37
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If you're talking about Jeff "Free" Luers, then I would say that the only person who got screwed was him. Twenty three years for causing $40k of damage is ridiculous. That's more than most murderers, thieves, rapists and kidnappers get. The SUV's were later refurbished and sold.
I could not agree more with that. This sentence was ridiculous excess and it's looking like he may have a reasonable chance at not serving the whole thing.

Justice might supposedly be blind, but it doesn't have to be.

I doubt all of the vehicles were refurbished though. The fire was hot enough to be melting the plastics on cars parked across the street!

Oops, I think we've digressed.
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Old 05-30-2007, 08:57 AM   #38
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First, I'd like to say BUMP!!!

That fellow caused more than 40K in damage, he destroyed over a dozen SUVs at an average of 40K each, damaged the car dealership they were at, most likely caused the dealership to have to shut for a while, cost the local PD and fire department money to contain the blaze and investigate, from the sounds of things damaged nearby facilities, and put a lot of lives in danger when the FD had to put things out. The cost of his little stunt most likely was in the millions of dollars. Then there is the environmental damage he did, by burning all those SUVs he pumped a lot of toxic smoke into the atmosphere, and the time, effort and environmental hit from the manufacturing process was completely wasted as nobody got use from those vehicles. Surely he didn't think the manufacturer was going to not just add a dozen more to the year's run. His jail term for his eco-terrorism is about right. And, yes, it was terrorism.

Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1) - Cite This Source
ter·ror·ism /ˈtɛrəˌrɪzəm/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[ter-uh-riz-uhm] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation
–noun
1. the use of violence and threats to intimidate or coerce, esp. for political purposes.
2. the state of fear and submission produced by terrorism or terrorization.
3. a terroristic method of governing or of resisting a government.

WordNet - Cite This Source
terrorism

noun
the calculated use of violence (or the threat of violence) against civilians in order to attain goals that are political or religious or ideological in nature; this is done through intimidation or coercion or instilling fear

American Heritage Dictionary - Cite This Source
ter·ror·ism (těr'ə-rĭz'əm) Pronunciation Key
n. The unlawful use or threatened use of force or violence by a person or an organized group against people or property with the intention of intimidating or coercing societies or governments, often for ideological or political reasons.

As you can see, his actions fit the classic definitions of terrorism. His goal was to cause people to stop selling SUVs, so this was terrorism for an ideological reason.

The better way for him to accomplish this would be to not buy SUVs, and try to convince others not to, or try to get laws passed to either make SUVs illegal or too costly to drive. The best way for that would be for the guy to run for office, then put forth bills to jack up the taxes on SUVs to astronomical levels. When the automakers approached him to get him to back off, ask for lots of money. When they pay the money, use that money to further the goal of getting SUVs off the road.

That being said, that Ford pic put me in mind of an electric conversion Fiero. Would be plenty for me to get to work and back, so long as it could maintain 70MPH. Range wouldn't be that important as I normally drive no more than 30 miles a day on workdays, so a top off every night would be easy to do. A 100 mile range with no more than a 3hr recharge would allow me to do everything I need to do 5 days a week. 80MPH with a 150 mile range, and I would only need a gasser once a month. Hell, if I could build 1 I could build 2, and then I'd only need the truck as a gasser, and use it every once in a great while when I have to go out of the local area or when I need an actual truck

And the only way electric cars will ever take off in this country is if they can maintain 90+MPH for at least 300 miles between fill-ups, with a means to recharge in 10 minutes. Either that, or 10 dollar a gallon gasoline.

The only way I see the 10 minute recharge happening right now, is if the battery packs were standardized and quickly removable, which would allow a person to pull into a station, and have a technician pull the depleted pack out and install a new pack, with that pack being guaranteed to last at least X amount of time. We'd also need a new way to calculate this that would be standard across all cars, like X times (Y +/- correction factor) to come up with a guaranteed mileage estimate. That guarantee would have to be something like if the battery craps out before you've gone this far, the company will send a vehicle out with a free battery pack or something. We'd also need a way to quickly determine if the mileage were cut due to travel or excessive power consumption, like a big stereo or using power accessories for a long time without moving.
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Old 05-30-2007, 05:05 PM   #39
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I like the battery exchange concept. Obviously there would have to be some compatibility between various cars for this to really take off. A company marketing their own high performance electrics could strategically place exchange locations across metropolitan areas, and with a quick-fit exchange system people could presumeably be in and out more quickly than the average gas fill up. Unfortunately I don't see any of that happening until the automakers get serious about electrics, but it seems a reasonable idea for the future.
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