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Old 01-28-2010, 04:17 PM   #11
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I'm one of those swapping saddles to the bike I'm riding. It's a late 60s leather model from Italy with no padding at all. No springs either. Sounds less then plush but once that leather is molded, by heat and sweat and the pressure of one's body weight, it follows one's anatomy with remarkable precision.
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Old 01-28-2010, 05:10 PM   #12
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You leather saddle guys are really something else!
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Old 01-28-2010, 09:32 PM   #13
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I weigh 225 at the start of the cycling season and my bike has Michelin Axial Carbon 23 x 700C tires....no problem, the tires last over 10,000 km on the front barring major road hazards and the rears wear out at over 5000 km.

For me the fun of cycling is speed. If I don't hit 80 km/h each day it seems like a bad one! So I would go for a drop bar bike any day.
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Old 01-29-2010, 07:45 AM   #14
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I have ~128,000 miles on my legs at this point and build my own bikes from discards. I like drop bars also, but that's me; personally, I'd recommend flat bars for somebody new or returning to the sport.

My advice would be similar to the others'...get a basic, unsuspended $250-400 mountain bike from a bike shop (not Wallyworld) and have the shop swap out the knobbies for some wide slicks. That'll give you a bulletproof ride that's reasonably enjoyable. If you decide later you want to improve on it somehow with a better ride, you can spend more money then; if you decide it isn't for you, you're not out big money.

Don't bother with department store bikes...The average mileage put on one of these between unboxing and the landfill is about 75 miles, and the manufacturers design to this constraint.

I'd also recommend avoiding older 10-speeds from yard sales; most of the older ones have rear wheels that wouldn't be reliable under heavier riders. Rear axle failures and broken left spokes were common in rear wheels from the last "bike boom".
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Old 01-29-2010, 09:44 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce View Post
I have ~128,000 miles on my legs at this point and build my own bikes from discards.
How much have you spent on tires/tubes over the years?
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Old 01-29-2010, 05:00 PM   #16
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re tire in post #4: Inverted tread tires have a lot of rubber, a lot of heavy rubber. A lighter weight tire will make a world of difference (an ounce off the wheel is worth a pound off the frame). The later advice for a semi-slick 26 inch is sound. The tread pattern affects traction almost the opposite of expectation: knobbier tread is less grip on all but deep sand or mud, "bald" tread grips pavement much better even in wet (no chance of hydroplaning with bicycle tires).

For a bunch of gas saving nerds, the bicycle advice posted has been exemplary (in other words: I concur).
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Old 01-29-2010, 06:30 PM   #17
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Justy FYI, I haven't bailed, I'm just reading everything and taking it in. I searched craigslist and there are TONS of options.
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Old 01-30-2010, 09:03 AM   #18
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Yesterday, 08:00 PM #16
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I think therefore I'm a vegetarian? I think therefore I use soy diesel?
Hmmm.... I like 'em both.
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Old 01-30-2010, 09:24 AM   #19
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I searched craigslist and there are TONS of options.
Yes, bargains can be had but I don't think this route will reward you. Unless you've got friends familiar with all aspects of cycling you're going to need the services of a good bike shop. Florence is sizable enough to have a few bike shops, I suspect. Ask around, then stop in just to introduce yourself, you'll quickly find a shop you're comfortable with. Purchasing a bike is just the start of your relationship. You'll need these guys for adjustments and maintenance and advice, you're purchasing a service more than a good. If your experience is typical they'll become good friends. Now don't drag your feet for long, the sooner you're on your shiny new bike the sooner it'll be repaying yourself in saved gas dollars, maintained or improved health and lots of smiles. The best age eraser on this planet is getting on a bike and the longer it's been the greater the reward. You won't regret it.
Go ahead, shut the computer, go get a bike. Tell us all about your new ride on your next post.
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Old 01-30-2010, 12:22 PM   #20
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The bike shop services are important. Most important of all, though, is getting the right fit. You won't get properly fit buying a used bike unless you're very good at bike fitting.
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