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Old 05-04-2008, 03:26 AM   #11
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This is what you need. But, I am a little biased. The Yamaha TW200, you can get a used one for around 1000-2500 depending on the year. New ones go for about 3,500. They get about 75 to 85 mpg and are considered dual purpose and street legal. They come with lights, blinkers, etc. The best thing about them is you can go offroad or go trail riding too. They don't have a lot of power and they are not designed to be a light dirt bike for jumping or anything like that. They are very versatile bikes and easy to control due to the small size and relatively low weight. Stock bikes can do 70 MPH However, If change the sprockets (front or rear) you can get close to 80 MPH. They are kind of similar to the Zuma or Ruckus scooters but with more power and better maneuvering and very low maintainace cost, it only takes 1 quart of oil and is air cooled. click on my gas log to see pic
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Old 05-07-2008, 01:20 PM   #12
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A scooter or a motorcycle is a good way to go. Scooters are very limited however. Small, slow, you cannot take most of them on the highway (400cc Minimum here in WI) and forget about a passanger. I have a Harley. I love it. It gets twice the mpg as my car, I can go anywhere in the country with it and people say high to me that I don't even know, just because I am on a bike. Granted, I do not get 70 mpg, but It is a heck of a lot cheaper than driving my car.
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Old 05-07-2008, 03:15 PM   #13
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IMHO, Motorcycle > Scooter.

Usually faster, louder, and girls want to go for a ride.
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Old 05-11-2008, 10:53 AM   #14
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Which coasts further?

Ignoring scooter fairings, motorcycle windshields and tire resisitance:

Would an automatic transmission scooter, on throttle off, coast as far as a motorcycle with the clutch in?

I would think that being able to choose to shift sooner (lower revs) to a higher gear would suggest a motorcycle?

I try to shift my Jetta TDI under 1200 rpm unless climbing a hill or bucking a headwind. I often shift under 1000 rpm around the neighborhood up to 30mph.
The diesel does have to torque to pull through without stalling... although I have killed it a couple times
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Old 05-11-2008, 12:54 PM   #15
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I rode over a 5" high curb at about 40 mph on my Honda FT500 Ascot (70 mpg) one dark and dewy morning, moved into the left turn lane too soon and didn't even see the curb at all..

I didn't come off the bike, if it had been a scooter there is absolutely no doubt in my mind I would have gone over the handlebars when the front wheel hit the curb..

Something to keep in mind..
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Old 05-11-2008, 01:36 PM   #16
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The auto transmission (variable belt drive) scooters I've ridden don't coast with the throttle off until the speed drops below about 10 mph.

Yes, there are potential fuel saving advantages to having a manual transmission.

Q

Quote:
Originally Posted by ArtFox View Post
Ignoring scooter fairings, motorcycle windshields and tire resisitance:

Would an automatic transmission scooter, on throttle off, coast as far as a motorcycle with the clutch in?

I would think that being able to choose to shift sooner (lower revs) to a higher gear would suggest a motorcycle?

I try to shift my Jetta TDI under 1200 rpm unless climbing a hill or bucking a headwind. I often shift under 1000 rpm around the neighborhood up to 30mph.
The diesel does have to torque to pull through without stalling... although I have killed it a couple times
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Old 05-11-2008, 04:16 PM   #17
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Therefore... manual scooters

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Originally Posted by QDM View Post
The auto transmission (variable belt drive) scooters I've ridden don't coast with the throttle off until the speed drops below about 10 mph.

Yes, there are potential fuel saving advantages to having a manual transmission.

Q
..is the Vespa PX200 currently the only manual transmission scooter on the market currently.

Thanks!
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Old 05-12-2008, 06:11 PM   #18
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I thought that Genuine Scooter's Stella was the only scooter with a manual transmission that's currently being produced in the US. Granted that it's a copy of the PX, but last I checked, the only PX's still in stores were the ones that hadn't been sold since they stopped production.

The Stella claims better fuel efficiency than the PX, and it's also less expensive. I've been considering buying a used one after I graduate and get settled into a job someplace, replacing my GTS250. The only thing holding me back is that it's a two-stroke.
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Old 05-12-2008, 09:31 PM   #19
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At least in Wisconsin if it's engine is over 50cc then you need a motorcycle license, the 50cc scooters are licensed as "mopeds" and they have all kinds of advantages, like being able to park on sidewalks (no more coins in the meter, or tickets), they are also required to have an automatic tranny to make them simple to operate, if you get above 50cc then by all means get a motorcycle, small wheels are unstable, are bad with potholes, step thru frames feel unstable and are harder to maneuver with.
I love my Tomos Arrow (not made in china) I use it for trips in to town because it is 50cc, I also just filled up today and got 108.5mpg with it.
If you want something that is just cheap to buy new, then check out the Sachs Madass, you can pick one up new for about $1,600 then put a Honda engine on with a 4 speed instead of the automatic two speed and you will have something that should get amazing mileage.
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Old 05-13-2008, 08:10 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Erik View Post
The motorcycle saddle bags could carry larger items that could stick out if necessary. I think that a small motorcycle will also be a bit safer because it will be more maneuverable and you can swerve better and accelerate quickly in the event that someone starts to pull out in front of you (believe me- it will happen to you).
Actually a scooter handles EXACTLY like a motorcycle...the only thing is it has a CVT and no clutch to shift gears, just because the tires are smaller doesnt mean it handles any differently

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Originally Posted by Sludgy View Post
I drive a big 650 cc dirt bike, but it only gets 55 mpg or so. I thought I'd get scooter-like mileage. It must be that it's too big and too geared for power.

My advice would be a ~250 cc street bike rather than a scooter. A scooter just won't keep up on the Interstate.

Aprilia makes a scooter with a direct-injection 50 cc two stroke engine. Direct injection should make it a lot more efficient than a carbureted 2 stroke. Anybody got actual mileage figures for it?
Most scooters that are 250cc or larger can handle freeway speeds nicely..even the Honda rebel 250 can go 70mph but it sounds like its going to explode...the Bergman 650 rivals many sportsbikes..don't underestimate the MODERN scooter..those things are sportsbikes you step thru, they hold TONS of stuff under the seat, get AWESOME gas mileage, and actually look much more decent than their older cousins, if you really want interstate speeds go with something in the 400cc range or higher, this way you know it can handle the speeds, you should expect approx 50-60mpg on a 400, 70-80 on a 250 (plus it all depends on how you ride)

Oh I also recommend this awesome motorcycle safety site!
http://www.msgroup.org
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