Hot air intake:How hot? - Fuelly Forums

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Old 05-27-2008, 04:27 PM   #1
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Hot air intake:How hot?

What kind of temps should I look for from a hot air intake? Where is the point of diminishing return as far as temperature goes? No sense in spending more money and working for "X" degrees if 2/3 "X" is enough.
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Old 05-27-2008, 04:31 PM   #2
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Not sure but most systems will compensate for any ambient temp. Record in the US is something like 137 degrees, so 140-150 would probably be your max range.

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Old 05-27-2008, 04:41 PM   #3
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depends on how far you drive; my work commute is only 12miles and I get up to 130 degrees. It's up to 100 degrees by the time the water temp gets to 195 degrees; after about 2 miles.
I've been as high as 175 degrees briefly in traffic, but leveled out to 150-160 on a 60mile drive. There were no problems. I think I read somewhere here that the engine starts acting up around 200 degrees of air intake temp.
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Old 05-27-2008, 05:28 PM   #4
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Thanks for the feedback guys.I made one for the Regal which draws air from behind the radiator. The one I made for the Ram is drawing from around the passenger side exhaust manifold.I wondered about the radiator supplying hot enough air, guess we'll find out. I found a meat thermometer at K-mart for $16 which has a range of 32 to 530 deg.F. Time for some testing.
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Old 05-27-2008, 05:33 PM   #5
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For carbed motors stick to coolant heat, otherwise you're likely to run into percolation issues, low pressure TBI setups might also suffer issues. MPFI and SEFI motors with injection pressures over 30 PSI or so should cope with pulling hotter air from exhaust shrouding or something.
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Old 05-27-2008, 07:46 PM   #6
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I have seen temps of 155 or so. with the warmer temps and the better grill block, my temps have stayed around that mark or at least 150.

lovemysan (I think that is his name) has done it on his and has said that 160-180 works well. he might be a good one to talk to. I think he is also the one that said that 200 was too high. can't remember right off hand.
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Old 05-29-2008, 05:39 PM   #7
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I got the thermometer hooked up in the Regal today.At an ambient temperature of 77 deg. F it maintained 140 deg. cruising down the road after warmed up.It went up to 157 deg. in town,but remember this is with 100% grill block. I may fab. up a pickup tube from around the exhaust manifold area to see if it changes much. I would think it would get warm sooner since It wouldn't need to warm up all of the coolant in the radiator first.Perhaps not better results,but quicker heat.
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Old 05-29-2008, 07:56 PM   #8
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WAI....I WANT to believe!

Not to hijack the original intent of the thread, but is there any measurable difference in FE??

I'm a big believer in "there's no free lunch", it still takes "X" BTU's of energy to move a given mass at a certain speed, you can't fool physics.
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Old 05-29-2008, 08:32 PM   #9
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WAI reduces air density, depending on the air temp compared to no WAI.

Air density at 200 degrees is 80% of density at 32 degrees.

Less dense air equals lower power, with less throttle restriction. It also allows fuel distribution to be better.

Last tank for me was 68.5 MPG, using operational tactics learned here. It's common knowledge that summertime FE is better than wintertime.

It probably reduces my max power from 96 to 85 HP, but I never use max power anyway.

In sustained high loads (like climbing a mountain) the much larger amount of incoming air would tend to make the air cooler so I still might have the 96 HP in that scenario. In all other cases I don't need it, since my car almost never sees more than 2500 RPM.

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Old 05-29-2008, 09:02 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R.I.D.E. View Post
WAI reduces air density, depending on the air temp compared to no WAI.

Air density at 200 degrees is 80% of density at 32 degrees.

Less dense air equals lower power, with less throttle restriction. It also allows fuel distribution to be better.

Last tank for me was 68.5 MPG, using operational tactics learned here. It's common knowledge that summertime FE is better than wintertime.

It probably reduces my max power from 96 to 85 HP, but I never use max power anyway.

In sustained high loads (like climbing a mountain) the much larger amount of incoming air would tend to make the air cooler so I still might have the 96 HP in that scenario. In all other cases I don't need it, since my car almost never sees more than 2500 RPM.

regards
gary
I agree with everything here, ('cept maybe "also allows fuel distribution to be better") but can one see a measurable difference in FE due to WAI?? The only real experiment I've seen is by MetroMPG here: http://www.metrompg.com/posts/wai-test.htm and his results are below the margin of error.

I can understand how a WAI would reduce warmup times, plus fuel usage would be less at idle, (less fuel to maintain Stoichiometric) but AFA I can tell, any other FE savings are the same as using less throttle.

I might try it anyway. I track my mileage with every tank and put on 40K/yr, so I may be a good candidate for experimenting....

Thanks for your quick and thoughtful reply, and good luck!
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