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Old 11-30-2005, 09:35 PM   #11
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Re: Shouldn't the air be as dense as possible?

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Originally Posted by CruiseControl
Maybe if you put the hair drier in the trunk, aim it out the back, and fire a little propane through it, you could use it as an afterburner.
okay, that was funny.
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Old 12-01-2005, 11:58 AM   #12
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Cool air is good for making

Cool air is good for making more power but warm air is better for mileage because it helps vaporize the fuel better. Unvaporized(liquid) fuel doesn't burn. Cool air would not allow as much vaporization.
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Old 12-01-2005, 04:29 PM   #13
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Oxygen - An Accelerant

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Originally Posted by CruiseControl
Speaking of which, who here has tried NO2 or O2 ? O2 is really cheap, and the sensors should pick it up...to a point.
Wait...that's a great idea -- the Oxygen setup. O2 is safe to transport (it's not flammable, it's just an accelerant). I suppose it's easy and cheap to get from a welding equipment supplier. Rig it up just like a NOS nozzle or similar by where a manual switch or accelerator pedal switch would start the flow. A little chemistry...

O2 is required for a hydrocarbon to combust. If more oxygen is added, like NOS, more power is produced from the same amount of fuel? A little O2 could go a long way. I didn't do so good at chemistry, so any help here?

RH77
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Old 12-01-2005, 05:49 PM   #14
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Re: Oxygen - An Accelerant

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Originally Posted by rh77
Quote:
Originally Posted by CruiseControl
Speaking of which, who here has tried NO2 or O2 ? O2 is really cheap, and the sensors should pick it up...to a point.
Wait...that's a great idea -- the Oxygen setup. O2 is safe to transport (it's not flammable, it's just an accelerant). I suppose it's easy and cheap to get from a welding equipment supplier. Rig it up just like a NOS nozzle or similar by where a manual switch or accelerator pedal switch would start the flow. A little chemistry...

O2 is required for a hydrocarbon to combust. If more oxygen is added, like NOS, more power is produced from the same amount of fuel? A little O2 could go a long way. I didn't do so good at chemistry, so any help here?

RH77
I've always understood though that NOS will destroy an engine rather quickly. Can the same be said about O2?
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Old 12-01-2005, 06:18 PM   #15
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Nitrous won't destroy and

Nitrous won't destroy and engine if it's used responsibily and correctly, so I dun see why the o2 would.
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Old 12-01-2005, 06:58 PM   #16
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Quick Reseach

NOS and 02 basically accomplish the same thing -- more Oxygen in the combustion chamber and less fuel. The side effect: lean and hot. Would an OBD-II ECU dump more fuel to compensate to cool the charge? OR if you get a Stoichiometric air/fuel ratio with an 02 addition, that would, in theory, use less fuel. But how can you monitor the temperature before it's too late and the internals are fried? Has this even been attempted for fuel economy purposes?

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Old 12-01-2005, 07:00 PM   #17
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Re: Oxygen - An Accelerant

Matt Timion Wrote:

I've always understood though that NOS will destroy an engine rather quickly. Can the same be said about O2?

They used to use an additive to gas during the summer (it was mandated in New York, because the air quaility was so bad) that increased the O2 in solution in the gasoline itself. This in turn increased the effiecincy of the burn, by allowing it to burn to completion. My guess is that that O2 is the limiting factor in the chemistry. Where it can be purchased would be a great question, as every major oil company had to include it in their gas, at only a few pennies a gallon extra to make. There was no mention of damage to the engines from the additive. Free O2 at those temperatures would probably oxidize almost anything, including oil, or an exhaust maniforld, that it came in contact with. So O2 would probably be better for the engine in the long run if it was in solution and associated with the correct reducing agent. It would certainly limit the temptation to increase the O2 and leave a patch at a light. Maybe the O2 valve could be bracketed by the O2 sensors in the exhaust, and intake manifolds (so the exhaust manifold, and cat aren't oxidized), and actuated by the...intake manifold pressure? It could even be something simple, like a light switched by the exhaust O2 sensor voltage, to warn a highway driver, to stop opening a valve. The Department of Tranportation lists Oxygen as a Class 2 substance, which puts it a full class ahead of Gas which is a Class 3...FYI Ammunition and Explosives, and Flares are Class 1. There would be a limit as to the size of the gas bottle, at least for transport commercially. So a little bottle, like the ones that come with MAP gas would be a smart start. Also the valves and hoses should be available generically, and so at a lower cost, than those for NO2.
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Old 12-01-2005, 07:57 PM   #18
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Re: Oxygen - An Accelerant

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Timion
Quote:
Originally Posted by rh77
Quote:
Originally Posted by CruiseControl
Speaking of which, who here has tried NO2 or O2 ? O2 is really cheap, and the sensors should pick it up...to a point.
Wait...that's a great idea -- the Oxygen setup. O2 is safe to transport (it's not flammable, it's just an accelerant). I suppose it's easy and cheap to get from a welding equipment supplier. Rig it up just like a NOS nozzle or similar by where a manual switch or accelerator pedal switch would start the flow. A little chemistry...

O2 is required for a hydrocarbon to combust. If more oxygen is added, like NOS, more power is produced from the same amount of fuel? A little O2 could go a long way. I didn't do so good at chemistry, so any help here?

RH77
I've always understood though that NOS will destroy an engine rather quickly. Can the same be said about O2?
The problem with injecting oxygen directly into your engine, is that oxygen LOVES aluminum. Your aluminum cylinder heads would quickly erode and your engine would be DESTROYED. I have a book on the ins and outs of Nitrous Oxide injection and this is a question they talk about [why not just inject oxygen?].
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Old 12-06-2005, 06:20 PM   #19
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Hot air intake

I recently put a total hot air intake on my 360 V-8 2bbl Jeep. Results are very good, even better as the temp drops (9 deg F today, below 0 tonight). This engine/carb setup has the old fashioned american lack of vaporization so just dump more gas set up. So as winter comes in I'm more preserving by warm season mpg. It runs great on hot air, very smooth as vaporization is improved.
How To: first I replumbed the vacuum system so that the stock hot air riser/heat stove is on and connected all the time. This will not provide enough air so I built another one on the other exhaust manifold from roof flashing (aluminum), replacement heat riser duct/hose, exhaust fittings on both end of hose for positive connections, hole saw into air cleaner and voila, another on all the time hot air input and now I have enough total air. Have run up to 70 deg F days OK but really shines as the temp drops. I can control total fuel flows thru the jets from the cab so monitor vaporization that way. Now I need to heat the fuel....
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Old 12-09-2005, 06:13 PM   #20
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Monitoring Vitals I've been

Hey everybody,

I've been working on a project for better gas mileage. I built a heat exchanger to heat the air/fuel charge using exhaust heat. It should be ready for a test run in a week or two. (It could be ready tomorrow but its hard to get out in the garage in this weather.) I've been reading through some of the posts here and noticed that some on this site are pretty computer savy and I'm hoping I can find some help here. I want to monitor the engine vitals when I test run this. Some I know how to do, most I don't.

A thermocouple in the intake and an O2 sensor in the exhaust, that's the easy part. I'd also like to monitor CO, Co2 and NOx in the exhaust. I got the impression from some of the posts the some are monitoring their fuel economy electronically. That would be real helpful, if its accurate. Any ideas? Without spending a fortune.

thanks,
dean
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