DIY: front end alignment...toe-in... - Page 2 - Fuelly Forums

Android Users - Coming Soon! - Migrating from aCar 4.8 to 5.0

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-21-2011, 05:39 PM   #11
Registered Member
 
Snax's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 758
Country: United States
Re: DIY: front end alignment...toe-in...

I 'kill' me . .
__________________

__________________
LiberalImage.com

I think, therefore I doubt.
Snax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2012, 09:32 PM   #12
Registered Member
 
masster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 10
Country: United States
Front Alignment Check - YouTube
__________________

masster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2012, 01:01 AM   #13
Registered Member
 
JanGeo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,442
Country: United States
Send a message via Yahoo to JanGeo
A quick and easy check is to sight or use a laser pointer at night on each tire and see where they converge in front of the car. If the beam does not converge you have toe out. You next do some geometry to calculate how far in from of the car the beams should meet based on the measuring width of the tires and the toe in angle.
JanGeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2012, 02:54 AM   #14
Registered Member
 
GasSavers_JoeBob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 698
Country: United States
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snax View Post
I use the Chitwood stunt driving technique. With the car travelling at 34 mph, I use a ramp to launch one side of the car up and proceed to drive on just two wheels. If I have to turn the wheel toward the ground, I have too much toe-in on that side. If I have to turn away from the ground, I have too much toe-out. After making adjustments and repeating the test to confirm accuracy, I use the ramp to launch the other side into the air and repeat.

When both sides have been adjusted this way, toe is perfect and the wheel is centered.

I dunno. Maybe QDM has the right idea.
That's the best method yet. I am a veteran of many attempts at DIY front end alignment. Considering the cost and time involved, the $45 I paid for my last alignment is a bargain. And my tires are finally giving me some decent life.
__________________
"We are forces of chaos and anarchy. Everything they say we are we are, and we are very proud of ourselves!" -- Jefferson Airplane

Dick Naugle says: 1. Prepare food fresh. 2. Serve customers fast. 3. Keep place clean.



GasSavers_JoeBob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2012, 04:46 AM   #15
Site Team / Moderator
 
Jay2TheRescue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 4,657
Country: United States
Location: Northern Virginia
Arrow

Years ago my best friend had flipped his truck on a windy back road, and it was so bad that just looking at the front wheels, even Stevie Wonder would tell you that they weren't pointing anywhere near the same direction. I helped his dad do a "redneck alignment" with twine checking the front tires in relation to the back. It wasn't perfect, but it was good enough that we were able to drive it to a shop to have a real alignment done.
__________________






Jay2TheRescue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2012, 06:06 AM   #16
Registered Member
 
masster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 10
Country: United States
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanGeo View Post
A quick and easy check is to sight or use a laser pointer at night on each tire and see where they converge in front of the car. If the beam does not converge you have toe out.
You gotta have very good eyes to see miles away in the night.
Not to mention you need a perfectly flat, remote, empty place to do that.
Then it has to be very clear outside.
Then you can't distinguish between zero toe and toe out.
Then... why do I even bother?
Welcome to the real world.
masster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2012, 05:23 PM   #17
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 200
Country: United States
I got a guy that uses a hunter alignment rack. 25$ Hardest part is getting there when he's open. I work too much. But very good write up. More pics.
Rusty94cx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2012, 08:37 AM   #18
Registered Member
 
JanGeo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,442
Country: United States
Send a message via Yahoo to JanGeo
Quote:
Originally Posted by masster View Post
You gotta have very good eyes to see miles away in the night.
Not to mention you need a perfectly flat, remote, empty place to do that.
Then it has to be very clear outside.
Then you can't distinguish between zero toe and toe out.
Then... why do I even bother?
Welcome to the real world.
With a 1 degree toe in the beam should meet at 37 feet assuming a 6 foot wide distance between side walls where you place the sighting device. If sighting by eye you do it in daylight! Half a degree toe in would be 75 feet.
JanGeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2012, 05:48 PM   #19
Registered Member
 
masster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 10
Country: United States
I don't know what kind of trigonometry you learn in US, but where I live the formula for measuring where 2 laser beams meet at 1 deg. toe in for one wheel is:

d = (track width) * tan(89)

which for a medium track width of 6 feet gives us d=343 feet

For half degree toe in, we get d=686 feet, and the more we get closer to zero toe (toe that most cars should have), the more laser beams meet ad infinitum.

Furthermore, a wheel alignment is done with respect to a known good reference, rear wheels. Trying to align 2 misaligned front wheels one to each other without having no clue what 'straight forward' is for any of them, is plain stupid.

So if I were you, I'd stop here, before embarrassing yourself even more.
masster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2012, 10:41 PM   #20
Registered Member
 
JanGeo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,442
Country: United States
Send a message via Yahoo to JanGeo
I had a little problem with the radian conversion but you are off by a factor of 2 since both wheels aim in a one degree so you should meet in the center ahead of the car at 169 feet. But you get the general idea that the distance is easy to measure to get accurate results since a half a degree is a difference of about 170 feet.
__________________

JanGeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Adding service costs to total cost statistics. Idontpayroadtax Fuelly Web Support and Community News 6 06-05-2014 12:02 AM
Metric Data Entry Added pb Fuelly Web Support and Community News 19 08-15-2008 07:01 AM

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 06:31 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.